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Camp Scott Wetlands Nature Preserve

Notebook: View nature up-close at Camp Scott wetlands

Statement issued Friday by the city:

Stop by after school or work

Fort Wayne’s Camp Scott wetlands will be open to the public on Thursday, May 20, from 2:00 – 7:00 PM with activities for all ages. Visitors can wander the wetlands or go on a wildflower identification walk, see a demonstration of water quality testing, learn to make compost or participate in other activities. Camp Scott is located at 3615 Oxford Street.

The Camp Scott constructed wetlands stores stormwater during rainy periods then releases it to the Maumee River after the storm sewer system has emptied. In addition to providing stormwater storage, the wetlands provide habitat for fish and wildlife. Wildlife seen at Camp Scott includes owls and other birds of prey such as hawks and falcons. Songbirds such as Yellow Rumped Warbler, Cedar Waxwings, several species of swallows, Grey Catbird and Flicker Woodpecker as well as a variety of frogs and turtles are often seen in and around the wetlands. The dead and dying trees in some areas promote the growth of beneficial bacteria and provide a habitat for the Indiana bat.

Camp Scott has been filed with native plants chosen specifically for their ability to help clean stormwater. The types of plants include prairie grasses, sedges as well as Aster, coneflower, gallardia, daisy, poppy, Black-Eyed Susan and Butterfly Milkweed flower at various times during year.

The following activities and demonstrations are scheduled for the afternoon of May 20:

2:00 – 4:00 Water Quality Testing Demonstrations

  • Presented by the St. Joseph River Watershed Initiative
3:00 Selecting Beautiful and Beneficial Native Plants for Your Garden and Wildflower Walk

  • Presented by Laura Stine from Neuhouser Garden and Gifts
3:45 How Wetlands Work for Everyone

  • Presented by Betsy Yankowiak from Little River Wetlands Project
4:00 Selecting Beautiful and Beneficial Native Plants for Your Garden and Wildflower Walk

  • Presented by Laura Stine from Neuhouser Garden and Gifts
4:30 How is a Wetlands Like a Coffee Filter?

  • Presented by Matt Jones from the Allen County Partnership for Water Quality
5:00 Composting – How to Make your Own Soil

  • Presented by the Fort Wayne Department of Parks and Recreation
5:30 Project WET

  • Presented by Matt Jones, Allen County Partnership for Water Quality

During World War II, a small part of the wetlands site was adjacent to a prisoner-of-war camp and military training facility that was named “Camp Scott”. This is the origin of the name of the wetlands.

Journey through gardening season with Rosa Salter Rodriguez (feature writer) rsalter@jg.net, Anne Gregory (Web editor and writer) agregory@jg.net, Frank Noonan (copy editor) fnoonan@jg.net and Cathie Rowand (photographer) crowand@jg.net.

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