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Cathie Rowand/ The Journal Gazette
A tomato plant comes up on its own next to a rhododendron.

Tomato weeds

Cathie Rowand/ The Journal Gazette
Tomato plants are crowding out a flower pot intended for marigolds and morning glories

I have been taught by my mother that a weed is any plant growing where you don't want it to grow. People spend lots of money to grow beautiful lawns, but if the grass starts growing up between the cracks in the sidewalk, it is a weed.

This summer I have weed tomato plants. I know this must sound strange as I wait for the first ripe tomato. Volunteer tomato plants are coming up all over the place where I have used compost.

I found seven tomato plants coming up in a flower pot that is just supposed to be marigolds and morning glories. A healthy tomato plant was growing next to my rhododendron. I have also pulled out several growing in my vegetable garden. You would think I'd leave them alone as they are a vegetable, but they would have crowded out the other plants.

I am giving a couple volunteer tomato plants a chance to grow in the vegetable garden. I am curious to see what type of tomatoes they produce. Most volunteer tomato plants are cherry tomatoes, but we shall see.

Journey through gardening season with Rosa Salter Rodriguez (feature writer) rsalter@jg.net, Anne Gregory (Web editor and writer) agregory@jg.net, Frank Noonan (copy editor) fnoonan@jg.net and Cathie Rowand (photographer) crowand@jg.net.

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