You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.
Advertisement
Cathie Rowand/ The Journal Gazette
Gray tree frogs are highly variable in color owing to their ability to camouflage themselves from gray to green, depending where they are.

Cucumber plants die despite a helpful guest

Cathie Rowand/ The Journal Gazette
Cucumber beetles are vectors of a bacterial wilt that killed this cucumber plant.

I always work in my garden with a small simple camera close by on the rain barrel. I shoot my gardening successes and failures, the insects and butterflies pollinating flowers, and insects destroying my plants. Sometimes I'll see something unique, like this common gray tree frog sitting on a cucumber leaf waiting for dinner.

Common gray tree frogs can change from gray to green to blend with their background. If I hadn't been busy looking for cucumber beetles, I probably wouldn't have noticed.

Tree frogs eat insects, and I was hoping that enough of cucumber beetles would be eaten to prevent them from spreading bacterial wilt. Wilt took over my cucumbers in August, and the overall production of cucumbers was not as wonderful as last summer.

Last summer I ended up canning pickles because I had more cucumbers than needed. This year I had just enough and ate the last edible cucumbers yesterday. The rest were too bitter, so I tossed them into the compost.

Journey through gardening season with Rosa Salter Rodriguez (feature writer) rsalter@jg.net, Anne Gregory (Web editor and writer) agregory@jg.net, Frank Noonan (copy editor) fnoonan@jg.net and Cathie Rowand (photographer) crowand@jg.net.

Advertisement