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Cathie Rowand / The Journal Gazette
A female bluebird builds a nest in a bluebird house. Installing nesting boxes helps bring back the bluebird population.

Curb appeal of bluebird house is finally noticed

I have spent most of the day watching a bluebird couple build a nest in a bluebird house. I think the female is doing most of the nest building while the male bluebird stands guard, chasing away other birds who noticed the nest building activity.

I hung a house a couple springs ago on a pole backing up to the woods with the expanse of my yard to the front. It is the best location for a bluebird house, and yet, it has taken a couple of years for the house to be noticed.

Sparrows found the house right away. I have diligently been removing their nests as they attempted to establish themselves. I felt bad doing so, but now that bluebirds are moving in, I feel it was the right thing to do.

Bluebird numbers have declined during the last century, but their populations has been given a boost by the birdhouse boxes. Sparrows don't seem to be declining in population.

I told my neighbor about the house, and I have to say he was a bit jealous. "Your bird house is crooked; they should be selecting one of my houses," replied my neighbor.

True, I could have done a better job installing the pole, but location is everything.

Journey through gardening season with Rosa Salter Rodriguez (feature writer) rsalter@jg.net, Anne Gregory (Web editor and writer) agregory@jg.net, Frank Noonan (copy editor) fnoonan@jg.net and Cathie Rowand (photographer) crowand@jg.net.

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