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Quick and easy scarf pattern
This is a republishing of a pattern that ran last year during the Red Scarf Project.
What you’ll need:
•Worsted weight yarn, any colors you’d like (remember think feminine and masculine)
•An “I” crochet hook
•Scissors
•Yarn needle
What you’ll do:
Foundation row: Chain 33
Row 1: Double crochet (DC) in fourth chain from hook; DC in next two chains (four DC total);
DC, chain 1, DC all in next chain; DC in next four chains; skip 2 chains; DC in next four chains;
DC, chain 1, DC in next chain; DC in next four chains; skip 2 chains; DC in next four chains; DC,
chain 1, DC in next chain; DC in next three chains; skip one and DC in last chain; Chain 2 and turn.
Row 2: Skip first two stitches; DC in next three stitches; three DC in chain 1 space (shell made);
DC in next four stitches; skip 2 stitches; DC in next four stitches; three DC in chain 1 space; DC in next four stitches; skip 2 stitches; DC in next four stitches; three DC in chain 1 space; DC in next three stitches; skip stitch; DC in turning chain from previous row; Chain 2 and turn.
Row 3: Skip first two stitches; DC in next three stitches; DC, chain 1, DC in next stitch (which should be the second DC of your 3 DC shell in the previous row); DC in next four stitches; skip 2 stitches; DC in next four stitches; DC, chain 1, DC in next stitch (again the second stitch of the previous row’s shell stitch); DC in next four stitches; skip 2 stitches; DC in next four stitches;
DC, chain 1, DC in next stitch; DC in next three stitches; skip stitch; DC in turning chain on previous row.
Repeat rows 2 and 3 for the desired length of scarf.
Note: The ideal scarf size would be 6 to 8 inches wide by 60 to 70 inches long so it can be wrapped for warmth.
File

Homeless shelter can use knit items

For this week’s installment of crafting for a cause, we spoke to Ann Helmke, director of Vincent Village, a shelter for homeless children and adults.

Two-thirds of the people Vincent Village serves are children. Many times the children are those of a single mother and the shelter is their last hope, Helmke said.

“They’ve probably lived in eight or nine different places and every time they’ve moved, they’ve moved in a hurry and had to leave things behind,” Helmke said. “They’ve already been through a lot by the time they walk through the shelter door.”

And, so, Vincent Village can certainly use any handmade items someone may offer, she said.

In addition, extra items collected because of the generosity of crafters in northeast Indiana also can be used in backpacks local agencies pass out during the annual homeless count in January, she said.

Anything donated should be machine washable and dryable.

Items such as hats, scarfs, mittens and blankets would be greatly appreciated and anything given to residents of Vincent Village will go with them when they leave, Helmke said. The shelter can house up to 12 families at a time, and when the families leave, the shelter sends their bedding with them, so there is a constant need to replenish blankets, sheets and pillow cases, Helmke said.

Anyone with questions can call Shirley Rork at the shelter at 456-4172, ext. 223, and items can be dropped off at the shelter just about any day of the week. Items can also be dropped off at the shelter offices, 2827 Holton Ave., Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For more information, go to www.vincentvillage.org.

And, remember, you can find free knit and crochet patterns under the “Crafty Living Patterns” link at www.journalgazette.net/craftyliving.

Joyce McCartney is not a craft expert. She is, however, interested in crafting of all types. She shares her experiences and those of area crafters. To reach her, call 461-8364 or email craftyliving@jg.net. Also, visit her blog at www.journalgazette.net/craftyliving. There, you will also find the weekly knitting podcast Math4Knitters.

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