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Execs in bailout see pay cut

Pay frozen at 2011 levels for GM, Ally, AIG top brass

– Top executives at three companies bailed out by U.S. taxpayers during the 2008 financial crisis were ordered to take pay cuts by the federal government.

The Treasury Department says nearly 70 executives at American International Group Inc., Ally Financial Inc. and General Motors Co. had their annual compensation reduced by 10 percent. The CEOs of each company had their pay frozen at 2011 levels.

All three companies have yet to repay what they received from the $700 billion bailout and therefore are subject to pay cuts.

AIG still owes taxpayers around $50 billion. General Motors owes about $25 billion. Ally Financial owes about $12 billion.

Even with the compensation freeze, the chief executives are expected to be well paid this year.

CEO Daniel F. Akerson of GM is expected to get $9 million in stock and salary this year.

Ally Financial’s CEO Michael A. Carpenter is set to earn $9.5 million in total compensation. Robert Benmosche, CEO of AIG, will make $10.5 million.

Akerson has criticized the pay limits, saying GM is losing some of its top talent in its executive ranks because of the government-imposed rules. GM got $49.5 billion from the government in 2008 and 2009.

“It’s the reality we have to live with, as long as we’re under the restrictions,” spokesman Jim Cain said.

In a statement, Ally Financial said pay for its executives “continues to be in line with the stated guidelines” for bailed-out companies and the company is “squarely focused on delivering value for shareholders and repaying the remaining U.S. Treasury investment.”

AIG declined to comment on the pay changes.

GM has a truck assembly plant in Allen County and a foundry in Defiance, Ohio.

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