You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Business

  • GM quarterly profit falls 85% on recall costs
    DETROIT – Recall expenses chopped $1.5 billion from General Motors’ bottom line in the second quarter, as it added up the costs of repairs for nearly 30 million cars and set aside funds to compensate victims of small-car crashes.
  • China detains employees of suspect meat seller
    Five employees of a company accused of selling expired beef and chicken to McDonald’s, KFC and other restaurants in China were detained by police Wednesday after an official said illegal activity was an organized effort by the
  • Meat supplier in China scandal has global reach
    It isn’t a household name, but the company at the center of a food scandal in China helps make some of the world’s most popular foods, including the Big Macs and Quarter Pounders served at McDonald’s locations.
Advertisement

Apple’s stock run stumbles on Nasdaq

– For most of the year, Apple has propelled the Nasdaq composite index forward. The stock climbed from $405 at the start of the year to more than $630 last week, and the Nasdaq easily beat the gains of other indexes.

Now Apple is sliding the other way and taking the Nasdaq with it.

Apple stock dropped more than $25 on Monday, its fifth straight day of declines. The losing streak has wiped out about $60 billion of Apple’s market value. That’s more than the most optimistic projections of the value of Facebook.

Apple helped push the Nasdaq composite index down 22.93 points on Monday to 2,988.40. The index is now up about 15 percent for the year after almost reaching 20 percent by the end of March.

“It’s been a very quirky market because it’s been a few companies that have delivered most of the rally this year,” said Mark Lamkin, CEO of Lamkin Wealth Management in Louisville, Ky. “It’s not been a broad-based rally.”

Apple, still the most valuable company in the world, accounts for 12 percent of the Nasdaq, more than any other stock. It has been on an almost uninterrupted climb for three years, powered by its hot iPhones and iPads.

But last week, a veteran technology analyst boldly issued a downgrade for Apple. He predicted that cellphone companies would probably stop offering such generous subsidies for customers to adopt the iPhone.

Investors may also be locking in profits and getting out before Apple reports earnings April 24. Even after the five-day decline, Apple stock is up 43 percent for the year.

“It’s had a huge run,” said Burt White, chief investment officer of LPL Financial in Boston. “Some investors probably said, ‘Might as well take some profits’.”

The broader stock market was flat, helped by strong March retail sales but hurt by continuing concerns about rising borrowing costs for debt-troubled Spain. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index dropped 0.69 point to 1,369.57.

Apple dragged down other technology stocks, which fell more than any other industry group in the S&P. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 71.82 points to 12,921.41, a gain of 0.6 percent. All but six of the 30 stocks that make up the Dow rose for the day, explaining why it rose while the S&P was flat.

Apple is not part of the Dow.

Advertisement