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Associated Press
This image provided by the Glendora Police Department shows the X-ray of a dog that was presented to the doctor by an undercover sheriff's deputy.

Dog X-ray trips up doctor in undercover sting

GLENDORA, Calif. – Investigators say a Southern California doctor saw enough from an X-ray to prescribe pain killers to an undercover cop but missed the tail.

Tail? Yup, of a dog.

Police and Los Angeles County deputies on Thursday raided the Glendora urgent care clinic of 69-year-old Dr. Rolando Lodevico Atiga after a 2-month investigation that included three undercover deputies posing as patients.

One of the undercover deputies showed Atiga an X-ray to prove she needed pain killers. The scan of her German shepherd clearly shows the dog's tail.

The Los Angeles Times (http://lat.ms/Nqk2NA) reported Atiga examined the X-ray and asked if she wanted Vicodin, oxycodone, Valium or Xanax.

Glendora police Capt. Timothy Staab says Atiga is well known among drug addicts and was considered the doctor to go to.

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