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Dennis Brown, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences at Manchester University's College of Pharmacy, conducts class. The school has about 70 students enrolled for its first classes.

Classes start at new College of Pharmacy

Photos by Laura J. Gardner | The Journal Gazette
Ema Hamidovic, middle, and other students take part in the first day of classes at Manchester University’s new College of Pharmacy on Monday.

About 70 students from across the country attended the first day of classes Monday at Manchester University's new College of Pharmacy.

The $20 million, 80,000-square-foot building is on Diebold Road, near Parkview Regional Medical Center.

Forty percent of the students are from Indiana, while the rest come from across the country. The student body is 54 percent white and 60 percent female, according to university officials.

The building has a capacity of 280 students, which officials say is plenty of space to accommodate future degree programs.

Gov. Mitch Daniels came to the ground breaking in August 2011.

At the time, he said graduates of the program would have noble, important careers that would benefit others.

dhaynie@jg.net

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