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Whooping cough clinic targets baby's caregivers

FORT WAYNE – Adults who care for infants are being encouraged to be vaccinated against whooping cough.

The Fort Wayne-Allen County Department of Health will conduct a special vaccine clinic from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. and 1 to 4 p.m. Monday at 4813 New Haven Ave.

“Grandparents Day is Sunday and one way to show grandchildren how much you care about them is by getting vaccinated against whooping cough," Wednesday’s announcement said.

Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, is a highly contagious bacterial infection that can strike at any age, but is particularly dangerous for infants, the department said.

It said many infants get pertussis from parents, grandparents, older siblings or other caregivers who might not know they have it.

Any adult can get a Tetanus-Diptheria-Pertussis shot for $39. Cash, debit cards and credit cards are accepted. An appointment is not necessary.

Verbatim

Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, is a highly contagious respiratory tract infection. Although the initial symptoms are similar to the common cold (runny nose, fever, congestion), whooping cough can turn more serious, particularly in infants.

Pertussis can cause violent and rapid coughing, over and over, until the air is gone from the lungs and you are forced to inhale with a loud “whooping” sound.

The best way to prevent it is through vaccination. The childhood vaccine is called DTaP. The whooping cough booster vaccine for adolescents and adults is called Tdap.

Both protect against whooping cough, tetanus and diphtheria.

For more information, visit www.allencountyhealth.com.

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