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Local politics

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    Allen County’s Republican Party chairman is offering suggestions for how the Fort Wayne City Council can take some of the sting out of its recent decision to end collective bargaining rights for 500 municipal workers.
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  • Another candidate challenges Stutzman
    Rep. Marlin Stutzman, R-3rd, has a second challenger in his bid for re-election this fall.Libertarian Scott Wise has joined Stutzman and Democrat Justin Kuhnle on the ballot for the Nov. 4 general election.
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Campaign trail
Obama, Romney headed to Ohio
COLUMBUS, Ohio – Both presidential candidates are headed back to Ohio as the start of early voting nears.
Republican Mitt Romney plans a cross-state bus tour Tuesday and Wednesday focused on the “Romney Plan for a Stronger Middle Class.” Running mate Paul Ryan is to kick off the effort today, landing in Dayton and traveling to an event in Lima.
President Obama is planning visits to Bowling Green and Kent on Wednesday. He’s highlighting his plan for building the economy “middle-out, not top-down.”
The visits come on the heels of a Dispatch/Ohio Newspaper Organization poll out Sunday showing Obama with a 51-46 lead over Romney among likely Ohio voters.
Ohio’s early absentee ballots have already been sent to overseas and military voters. Others can begin voting early starting Oct. 2.

Obama rebuts Mideast criticism

Answers attacks by Romney on foreign policy

– President Obama, defending his foreign policy record at a time of anti-American rage in the Muslim world, fired back at suggestions from Republican Mitt Romney that the president has been weak with allies and enemies alike.

In an interview airing the night before Obama meets with other world leaders at the United Nations, the president said, “If Gov. Romney is suggesting that we should start another war, he should say so.”

It was Obama’s most direct rebuttal yet to persistent skepticism by his White House rival on his handling of an unraveling situation in the Middle East. Romney has charged the U.S. stance has been marred by miscalculations, mixed messages and appeasement.

As far back as May, Romney was condemning Obama’s response to unrest in Syria, dubbing it a “policy of paralysis” and calling for more assertive measures, such as arming the opposition to Syrian President Bashar Assad. As deadly anti-American protests erupted earlier this month in Libya and elsewhere, Romney sought to undercut what polling shows is a significant foreign policy edge for Obama by calling the president’s handling of the situation “disgraceful” and decrying a lack of U.S. leadership in the region.

In a companion interview to Obama’s appearance on CBS’ “60 Minutes,” Romney broadened his reproach to include Israel, criticizing Obama’s failure to meet with the U.S. ally’s head of state, Benjamin Netanyahu, during the annual U.N. gathering. Romney called it a mistake that “sends a message throughout the Middle East that somehow we distance ourselves from our friends.”

The White House has said scheduling precluded a meeting between the two leaders, who won’t be in New York at the same time. With the final six weeks of a hard-fought election hanging over the U.N. summit, Obama has opted out of face-to-face meetings with any of his counterparts – not just Netanyahu – during his compressed U.N. visit.

But Obama pushed back on the notion that he feels pressure from Netanyahu, dismissing as noise the Israeli leader’s calls for the U.S. to lay out a “red line” that Iran’s nuclear program mustn’t cross to avoid American military intervention.

“When it comes to our national security decisions, any pressure that I feel is simply to do what’s right for the American people,” Obama said. “And I am going to block out any noise that’s out there. “

The interviews also offered glimpses into both candidates’ personal habits, including their late-night routines. Romney said his nightly prayer is a time to connect both with the divine and with his own thoughts, and he said he asks God mainly for wisdom and understanding.

Obama said he hunkers down for reading, writing and occasionally a moment alone on the Truman Balcony, with the Washington Monument and Jefferson Memorial in view.

– Associated Press

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