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GOP candidates more wary about Romney campaign

– On the eve of the first presidential debate, the early-autumn Republican reviews are in for Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign, and they are not pretty.

In some states, candidates who share the Nov. 6 ballot with the former Massachusetts governor already have taken steps to establish independence from him. Party strategists predict more will follow, perhaps as soon as next week, unless Romney can dispel fears that he is headed for defeat despite the weak economy that works against President Obama’s prospects.

Former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, who headed the Republican Party when it won control of Congress in the 1990s, said disapprovingly over the weekend that Romney’s campaign has been focusing on polling, political process and campaign management.

“It’s about everything but the issues. It’s about everything but Obama’s policies and the failures of those policies,” he said.

Prominent party strategist Matthew Dowd says the Romney campaign was almost guilty of political malpractice over the summer and during the political conventions. It “left the playing field totally to Barack Obama and the Obama campaign” and “basically set the tone for the final 60 days of this campaign, which put them behind after the conventions,” Dowd said.

Ed Gillespie, a senior adviser to Romney, defended the campaign in a conference call with reporters Monday.

“Our message is very clear, which is we cannot afford four more years like the last four years. And we need a real recovery, we need policies that are going to help,” he said.

Republicans say there is time for Romney to steady his campaign but only if he acts quickly.

It is unclear how long congressional candidates are willing to wait for a turnaround. Several Republican strategists point to this week, which includes the debate and Friday’s release of September unemployment figures.

Some Republicans who are in periodic contact with the campaign say Romney’s strategists have concluded that a recent uptick in public optimism, coming on top of Obama’s success to date, complicates the attempt to defeat the president solely on the basis of pocketbook issues.

In recent days, Romney has emphasized criticism of the president’s foreign policy, particularly in the Middle East, where a terrorist attack at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, left Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans dead.

Privately, GOP strategists agreed with Barbour’s public statement that Romney’s campaign has been unable so far to settle on a single, overarching theme to tie together its advertising, the rhetoric of its candidate and appearances by surrogates.

Many of the Republicans who commented on the race declined to be identified by name.

In one statement emailed on Monday, the campaign quoted vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan as telling WTJM in Milwaukee: “This election is a clear choice between different paths.”

That was close to what the Obama campaign wants, and considerably different from Romney’s earlier insistence that the race is a referendum on the president’s performance in office.

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