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Associated Press
File - Blood is seen around the ankle of Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling during the first inning of Game 2 of the World Series in Boston, Sunday, Oct. 24, 2004. Schilling was pitching with a dislocated ankle tendon held together by suture.

Schilling could have to sell bloody sock

BOSTON (AP) — Former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling could be forced to sell a blood-stained sock he wore to lead the team to its first World Series championship in 86 years, as well as other memorabilia, to help pay back millions of dollars in loans he guaranteed for his failed video game company.

The sock, worn by Schilling in the 2004 World Series, was among the collateral he pledged to lenders, according to a document filed with the Massachusetts Secretary of State's office.

A sports memorabilia expert tells The Boston Globe (http://b.globe.com/SIJ22l) the sock could fetch up to $25,000.

Other items used as collateral include a cap worn by New York Yankees great Lou Gehrig and Schilling's collection of World War II memorabilia.

The Rhode Island-based company, 38 Studios, filed for bankruptcy in June.

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