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Associated Press
The carcass of a 16-year-old mammoth was excavated on the North Siberian Taimyr peninsula on Sept. 28.

Mammoth carcass uncovered in Siberia

– A teenage mammoth who once roamed the Siberian tundra in search of fodder and females might have been killed by an Ice Age man on a summer day tens of thousands of years ago, a Russian scientist said Friday.

Professor Alexei Tikhonov of the Zoology Institute in St. Petersburg announced the finding of the mammoth, which was excavated from the Siberian permafrost in late September near the Sopochnaya Karga cape, 2,200 miles northeast of Moscow.

The 16-year-old mammoth has been named Jenya, after the 11-year-old Russian boy who found the animal’s limbs sticking out of the frozen mud.

The mammoth was 6 feet, 6 inches tall and weighed 1,100 pounds.

“He was pretty small for his age,” Tikhonov told The Associated Press.

But what killed Jenya was not his size but a missing left tusk that made him unfit for fights with other mammoths or human hunters who were settling the Siberian marshes and swamps about 20,000 to 30,000 years ago, Tikhonov said.

The splits on Jenya’s remaining tusk show a “possible human touch,” he added.

The examination of Jenya’s body has already proved that the massive humps on mammoths seen on Ice Age cave paintings in Spain and France were not extended bones but huge chunks of fat that helped them regulate their body temperatures and survive the long, cold winters, Tikhonov said.

Up to 13 feet in height and 10 tons in weight, mammoths migrated across huge areas between Great Britain and North America and were driven to extinction by humans and the changing climate. Wooly mammoths are thought to have died out around 10,000 years ago, although scientists think some lived longer in Alaska and on Russia’s Wrangel Island off the Siberian coast.

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