You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Professional

  • Italian keeps lead after long stage
    BAGNERES-DE-LUCHON, France – Riding in his 10th Tour de France, three-time world champion Michael Rogers of Australia finally got his first stage victory Tuesday by leading a breakaway group to a downhill finish as the pack entered the Pyrenees.
  • Fowles helps Sky edge Fever
    ROSEMONT, Ill. — Sylvia Fowles had 21 points, 10 rebounds and four blocked shots to help the Chicago Sky beat the Indiana Fever 60-57 on Tuesday night, snapping a six-game losing streak.
  • Padres trade ex-Wizard Headley to Yankees
    NEW YORK – Trying to add offense at third base, the New York Yankees have acquired ex-Wizard Chase Headley from the San Diego Padres for infielder Yangervis Solarte and right-hander Rafael De Paula.
Advertisement
Playoff notebook

Wild pitch flu has infected A’s, Tigers, Reds, Nationals

These playoffs sure are getting wild.

With wild pitches, that is.

By the bay in San Francisco to Motown’s Comerica Park and Busch Stadium in the Midwest, pitchers are flinging balls to the backstop with a regularity rarely seen in October.

Jitters? Adrenalin? Just plain overthrowing? It’s something, all right.

“Perhaps some of the guys might be trying too hard and they’re bouncing the balls way in front of the plate,” Reds manager Dusty Baker said. “The ones I’ve seen didn’t give the catchers much chance to catch it. I just hope we don’t have any.”

Actually, all the wildness got the Reds coaches chatting about it on the way to AT&T Park for Sunday’s Game 2 against the Giants.

Cincinnati closer Aroldis Chapman threw two wild pitches Saturday night, including one that scored a run in his team’s 5-2 victory in the playoff opener at San Francisco.

There were two more in the eighth inning at Detroit on Sunday that brought home runs – one for each team in the Tigers’ 5-4 win against the Oakland Athletics. That’s the first time in postseason history in which both teams scored a tying run on a wild pitch in the same inning, according to STATS LLC.

“Man, that Oakland game was wild, wasn’t it?” Giants manager Bruce Bochy said without prompting. “It’s a little different time. Pitchers are trying to put a little bit more on it, trying to make that great pitch.”

Then, Washington Nationals 21-game winner Gio Gonzalez had one of his own. The wild pitch scored a run after Gonzalez walked four of the first five batters in a 3-2 Game 1 win against St. Louis.

Fading memory

Andy Pettitte was in his second season in the majors when the New York Yankees last faced the Baltimore Orioles in the playoffs, so forgive the left-hander if his memory of the 1996 AL championship series is a little fuzzy.

“I remember it was a good series. I believe I had the opportunity to pitch,” Pettitte said Sunday, hours before the Yankees were to open their AL division series against Baltimore. “It helped us get to the World Series, that’s something I remember.”

Other than that, not much.

“It was a long time ago,” he said. “I’m trying real hard right now, but it’s as good as I can get. I may be wrong, but I believe I was able to pitch here in Baltimore.”

Not only did Pettitte pitch, but he won the clincher. He also started Game 1, although fan Jeffrey Maier’s performance was arguably more memorable.

Pettitte is scheduled to start Game 2 today.

1 lefty in bullpen

Cardinals manager Mike Matheny is playing the NL division series with just one left-handed reliever.

Matheny, however, has reason to be confident in the late innings: his three righties.

Marc Rzepczynski is the lone left-hander in the St. Louis bullpen after the Cardinals opted not to include rookie Sam Freeman.

Edward Mujica has generally handled the seventh inning, Mitchell Boggs the eighth and Jason Motte the ninth.

“We have been pretty consistent in our formula with seven, eight, nine, sticking with our three guys,” Matheny said. “And that’s something that we’ll most likely continue to do. We’ll have the one lefty to pick a spot, whether to get one of those three out of trouble, or if need be, before that.”

Advertisement