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Associated Press
President Obama walks with Cesar Chavez’s widow, Helen F. Chavez, left, and Dolores Huerta as they tour the Cesar E. Chavez National Monument on Monday in Keene, Calif.

Cesar Chavez home gets monument status

– President Obama on Monday designated the home of Hispanic labor leader Cesar Chavez as a national monument, calling Chavez a hero who brought hope to millions of disenfranchised farm workers who otherwise might have remained “invisible” to much of the nation.

“Today, we celebrate Cesar Chavez,” Obama said at a ceremony at La Paz, the California farmhouse where Chavez lived and worked for more than two decades. “Our world is a better place because Cesar Chavez decided to change it.”

The 187-acre site, known as Nuestra Senora Reina de la Paz (Our Lady Queen of Peace), or simply La Paz, was the union’s planning and coordination center starting in 1971. Chavez and many organizers lived, trained and strategized there.

Obama’s action designates 105 acres at the site near Bakersfield, Calif., as a national monument, the fourth monument he has designated under the Antiquities Act. The action could shore up support from some Hispanic and progressive voters for Obama, whose 2008 “yes we can” slogan borrowed from Chavez’s motto, “Si, se puede.”

When the Arizona-born Chavez began working as an organizer after World War II, “no one seemed to care about the invisible farm workers who picked the nation’s food,” Obama said. “Cesar cared. And in his own peaceful, eloquent way, he made other people care, too. Where there had once been despair, Cesar gave workers a reason to hope.”

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