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Briefs

Foundation head leaves for Stanford

Dr. George Sledge, co-director of the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories, is leaving the Indiana University Cancer Center in Indianapolis for a post in California. He was asked to head Stanford University’s oncology division.

“Stanford is one of the top medical schools in the country, with unparalleled opportunity for developing a great cancer program, and was a prospect that I did not feel I could pass on,” Sledge wrote in an email to Catherine Hill, executive director of the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer.

“We don’t see this as losing a researcher, as it may offer more opportunity for collaboration, and ultimately lead to a cure,” Hill said in a written statement.

Sledge is a former president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. The organization of cancer doctors and researchers has more than 30,000 members worldwide. Sledge, who specializes in the study and treatment of breast cancer, joined the IU School of Medicine in 1983 and was named a distinguished professor in 2012.

BND Commercial, GM earn Chamber awards

The Greater Fort Wayne Chamber of Commerce selected two businesses, an individual and a group for recognition this year for its 2012 Business of the Year Awards.

BND Commercial Real Estate, which employs 30, was chosen as Small Business of the Year. The 8-year-old partnership has played a key role in developing Fort Wayne’s downtown with projects including Harrison Square, the Anthony Wayne condos, and the Lutheran Sports Complex.

General Motors Co., which employs more than 3,600 locally, received the Large Business of the Year Award. The automaker has made a substantial impact on the community by recently bringing 700 new families to the area, supporting non-profits and making the truck assembly plant landfill-free.

Arthur Snyder, president of Indiana Tech, was named CEO of the Year at Monday’s ceremony. He is known as “a great motivator and someone people look up to,” the Chamber said in its announcement. Indiana Tech will open the region’s first law school next year.

The Chamber also created the Community Impact Award this year to honor contributions made by Col. David Augustine and the 122nd Fighter Wing. The men and women were recognized for service to the country and the community.

Area job growth has national ranking

A study has found the Fort Wayne Metropolitan Statistical Area is one of only 23 in the country that every month since September 2010 has posted a higher percentage of job growth than the national average.

There are 372 MSAs nationwide. Fort Wayne’s MSA includes Allen, Wells and Whitley counties.

The findings were released by Garner Economics LLC, a consulting firm based in Atlanta. In the 23-month period reviewed, the U.S. averaged a meager 1.1 percent job growth. Indiana’s job creation rate was not included in the report.

John Sampson, president and CEO of the Northeast Indiana Regional Partnership, said in a written statement that the data affirm that area economic development officials “are on the right track in creating truly transformative change in northeast Indiana.”

Sampson expects the region’s job growth to gain momentum in coming months.

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