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Associated Press
Edward Archbold celebrates winning a roach-eating contest at the Ben Siegel Reptiles store in Deerfield Beach, Fla. Archbold, 32, died shortly after.

Death of insect-eater raising questions

People asking what happened and why do it

– As a Florida medical examiner tries to determine how 32-year-old Edward Archbold died after eating insects during a contest to win a snake, people around the country are asking: Why?

Why would anyone eat a live cockroach? Why did he die when several others in the contest ate the same bugs without incident? What inspired Archbold – who was described by the snake store owner as “the life of the party” – to shovel handfuls of crickets, worms and cockroaches into his mouth?

While eating bugs is normal in many parts of the world, the practice is taboo in the U.S. and many western countries. Yet people do it for the shock factor, and many do so during contests or dares.

Just last year, folks ate Madagascar cockroaches at a Six Flags in Illinois for a chance to win park passes. Also last year, people ate live roaches at the Exploreum Science Center in Mobile, Ala.

And a few years back at Universal Studios in Orlando, contestants in a theme park show purportedly consumed a mix of sour milk, mystery meat and bugs.

Experts point to the rise in reality TV shows and movies such as “Fear Factor” and “Jackass” as egging people on and breaking down the ick factor.

What made Archbold participate in the bug-eating contest is a bit unclear; he had eaten bugs before, said his girlfriend. He had planned on giving the female python to a friend if he won.

Natasha Proffitt, 27, of West Palm Beach, said Archbold told her about the contest just hours before it started on Friday. When she asked him whether it was a good idea, he said “it was not a big deal.”

The store, Ben Siegel Reptiles in Deerfield Beach, had been touting the contest for days on its popular Facebook page; earlier on Friday it posted a flier that said the event was “featuring the soon to be infamous ‘eat bugs for balls’ contest,” referring to the prize of a female ivory ball python.

Sarah Bernard, an entomology student at the University of Florida, attended the contest – held during the store’s “Midnight Madness Sale” – and shot video on her phone of Archbold during the competition.

“I was focusing on him because I was closest to him and he was really entertaining,” she said of Archbold. “I saw that he had a clear strategy. He would push everything into his mouth and try to swallow it with water. He figured out what worked and he did it.”

Bernard said she did not see Archbold immediately after the competition ended. She recalled that an announcer said “the winner is vomiting somewhere, and we’ll congratulate him when he comes back.”

Archbold, of West Palm Beach, collapsed in front of the store, according to a Broward Sheriff’s Office statement released Monday. He was taken to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Authorities were awaiting autopsy results to determine a cause of death.

“Eating insects in a contest is a recent, ‘Fear Factor’ phenomenon,” said Coby Schal, a professor of entomology at North Carolina State University. “But I have not heard of anyone having that type of response.”

He said people may have allergic and asthmatic responses to cockroaches, such as homes infested with roaches, and children are very seriously allergic to them. Dust from roaches’ wings and exoskeletons – roaches shed their skins – often triggers asthma in people.

“All insects, if you are allergic to a particular insect, you can have an allergic response to it. Whether he had an allergic sensitivity to a wide variety of insects or just to roaches, there is no way of telling,” Schal said.

Mike Tringale, the vice president of The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, said it’s possible that Archbold “hit his tolerance level to cockroach allergens” and went into anaphylactic shock.

Tringale said that such a severe reaction to cockroaches is “probably rare,” however.

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