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Local politics

  • Lawmakers sport local jerseys
    Weather permitting, federal lawmakers wearing the uniforms of IPFW and Trine University are scheduled to take the field at tonight’s Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game for Charity in Washington, D.C.Sen. Joe Donnelly, D-Ind.
  • Stutzman says bid for whip long shot
    Rep. Marlin Stutzman, R-3rd, says he is running for House majority whip because nobody else from his conservative circle was willing to.“They were not happy with anyone who was running, and I said, ‘Well, you know what?
  • Stutzman in race for House majority whip
    Rep. Marlin Stutzman, R-3rd, said Wednesday he wants to see a “red-state conservative” as the next House majority whip.By Thursday, he reportedly had decided he is that person.
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Looking ahead
Attention now shifts to the two remaining debates between Obama and Romney:
•Tuesday’s town hall-style faceoff in Hempstead, N.Y.
•Oct. 22 showdown over foreign policy in Boca Raton, Fla.
Analysis

VP went on attack; Ryan stayed cool

It was as much a do-over as a debate.

Vice President Biden ostensibly took the stage Thursday night to square off against the man who seeks to replace him, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis.

But almost from the moment the debate began in Danville, Ky., it was clear that Biden’s real mission was to do what President Obama failed to in his own lackluster performance against Republican nominee Mitt Romney last week.

And in doing so, Biden was seeking to repair the damage from that stumble on Obama’s part, which has moved poll numbers across the map in the direction of the GOP ticket.

On issue after issue, Biden defended what the Obama administration has done and painted the Republican ticket as out of step with the concerns of average Americans.

“A bunch of malarkey,” Biden said when Ryan warned that cutting defense spending would make the country weak.

“I’ve never met two guys who’re more down on America across the board,” the vice president added when the subject turned to the economy.

Ryan, on the other hand, chose to play it cautiously, seeking to avoid mistakes, to display the mastery of fiscal policy that he has gained as chairman of the House Budget Committee and to reassure swing voters that the policies of a Romney presidency would not decimate social programs.

When he was talking, Biden dominated the debate and an opponent 27 years his junior.

And though Biden is a man with a reputation for making gaffes, his worst moments came when he wasn’t talking but remained under the unblinking gaze of the camera.

As Ryan spoke, the split screen picked up Biden’s grins and chortles, suggesting a dismissiveness and scorn for the views of an opponent he repeatedly called “my friend,” and he appeared to make no attempt to suppress them.

Although Biden’s frequent interruptions may have revived the spirits of the Democratic faithful, they may have been too much for less partisan viewers.

“Mr. Vice President, I know you’re under a lot of duress to make up for lost ground, but I think people would be better served if we don’t keep interrupting each other,” Ryan said at one point.

Biden made many of the arguments that Obama failed to in his first debate.

For instance, Biden raised Romney’s comment, caught on videotape, that the 47 percent of Americans who do not pay income taxes are government-dependent freeloaders who consider themselves victims.

“These people are my mom and dad, the people I grew up with, my neighbors,” Biden said. “They pay more effective tax (through payroll and other taxes) than Governor Romney pays in his federal income tax. They are elderly people who, in fact, are living off of Social Security. They are veterans and people fighting in Afghanistan right now.”

Ryan defended Romney, drawing laughs from the audience when he said: “The vice president very well knows that sometimes the words don’t come out of your mouth the right way.”

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