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Associated Press
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton says the U.S. must continue sending aid to the Arab world.

Clinton says aid in Arab world still essential

– Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, addressing criticism of the Obama administration’s handling of a deadly attack on U.S. consulate in Libya, on Friday defended the need for American diplomats and aid workers in the Arab world’s young democracies, even amid a growing threat from al-Qaida spinoffs.

“We will not retreat,” she said in a speech at a Washington think tank.

“We will never prevent every act of violence or terrorism, or achieve perfect security,” Clinton said. “Our people can’t live in bunkers and do their jobs. But it is our solemn responsibility to constantly improve, to reduce the risks our people face and make sure they have the resources they need to do their jobs.”

Her address at the Center for Strategic and International Studies comes as Republicans seized on the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, as a sign of what they say is the administration’s weak foreign policy, intelligence failures and a laissez-faire attitude toward security at diplomatic missions in hot spots. She spoke a day after a Yemeni security official at the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, was assassinated on his way to work.

With only weeks before the presidential election, the outrage has crystallized around Vice President Biden for claiming in Thursday’s debate with Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan that “we weren’t told” about requests for extra security at the consulate where assailants killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans.

Congressional hearings this week revealed that the State Department was aware of, and rejected, several requests for increased security in Benghazi. Spokesman for both the State Department and the White House took pains Friday to make clear that Biden’s “we” referred to the White House, where such requests would not go.

Clinton said she wanted to find out exactly what happened in Benghazi more than anyone, but did not go into the specifics of the consulate’s security. Instead, she focused on the larger question of why the U.S. diplomats were stationed in the largely lawless Libyan city.

“Diplomacy, by its very nature, is often practiced in dangerous places,” she said.

Twenty-one months into the Arab Spring, Clinton stressed that the promise of new democracies in an area of the world long dominated by autocratic rulers has not been lost. She said the U.S. needed to keep fostering the elected governments and free citizens who, she hoped, would define the region’s future.

“For the United States, supporting democratic transitions is not a matter of idealism. It is a strategic necessity,” she said. “We will not pull back our support for emerging democracies when the going gets tough. That would be a costly strategic mistake that would undermine both our interests and our values.”

The main strains of criticism from Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and other Republicans are that the U.S. is failing to effectively shape new Arab governments such as Libya and Egypt and that U.S. security at its diplomatic installations has been inadequate.

The secretary of state stressed that the transitions “are not America’s to manage, and certainly not ours to win or lose.” But she said a U.S. leadership role was important “to strengthen democratic institutions, defend universal rights, and drive inclusive economic growth.

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