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Macedonia health advisers? Only geniuses need apply

SKOPJE, Macedonia – Macedonia’s health minister is looking for assistants – but they have to be certified geniuses.

Nikola Todorov’s ministry announced Thursday that it needs seven to 10 advisers, to consult once or twice a month for a daily fee of $64 to $100.

The announcement said successful candidates must possess an IQ score of at least 140, certified by the Mensa International IQ society. They also must have a university degree and speak at least two foreign languages.

Macedonian public servants are not normally required to take IQ tests, but Todorov can be demanding. He recently angered state doctors by linking their salaries with the number of patients they treat.

The average intelligence quotient is 90 to 110. Above 140, people are considered geniuses.

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