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Associated Press
Garments lie in boxes near equipment charred in the Nov. 24 fire that killed 112 workers at the Tazreen Fashions Ltd. factory near Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Shoppers unfazed by fire

Workers’ conditions out of mind when people buy garments

– Before purchasing a shirt, shoppers will run their hands over the fabric, look at the price tag and wonder how it will hold up in the washing machine. Some might even ask if it makes them look fat.

The one detail, however, that is rarely considered: What are the conditions like for the workers making the shirt?

A horrific fire that raced through a Bangladesh garment factory last Saturday, killing 112 people, has put the spotlight – at least temporarily – back on those workers and their sometimes treacherous work environment.

The factory, owned by Tazreen Fashions Ltd., made clothing for several retailers around the globe including Wal-Mart, Sears and The Walt Disney Co. All three companies have distanced themselves from responsibility for the tragedy, saying they didn’t know their subcontractors were using the factory.

Holiday shoppers have also maintained their distance from the tragedy.

“Truthfully, I hadn’t even thought about it,” said Megan Miller of Philadelphia as she walked out of the Disney Store in Times Square. “I had Christmas on my mind and getting my kids something from New York.”

Shoppers from Cincinnati to Paris to Singapore all said the same thing: They were aware of the fatal factory fire, but they weren’t thinking about it while browsing stores in the days since. Brand name, fit and – above all – prices were on their minds.

“Either our pockets get lighter or we have to live with more blood on our hands,” said Amy Hong, a college student who was at a store in Singapore. “I try not to think about it.”

Experts who survey shoppers say the out of sight, out of mind attitude is nothing new.

“Where something is made, or the abuses in some country, almost never show up,” said C. Britt Beemer, chairman of America’s Research Group, which interviews 10,000 to 15,000 consumers a week, mostly on behalf of retailers. Even those who want to make socially responsible purchases a priority have little information available to work with.

There’s no widespread system in place to say where all the materials in a shirt come from let alone whether it was made in a sweatshop or not.

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