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Rotting whale casts foul stench into Malibu

MALIBU, Calif. — A dead whale rotting near the Malibu homes of Barbra Streisand, Bob Dylan and other celebrities is causing a gigantic cleanup problem as authorities try to decide who's responsible for getting rid of it.

Los Angeles County lifeguards planned to try to pull the 40,000-pound carcass out to sea at high tide, said Cindy Reyes, executive director of the California Wildlife Center.

But fire Inspector Brian Riley said that's unlikely to work.

"You would need a tug boat to drag it out to sea," Riley told City News Service in a report Thursday.

"It is entrenched in the sand and impossible to tow free even at high tide," Riley said. "Burial at low tide will be difficult as well as land removal. It's in an area with bad access."

The city was not sure who would do the job, spokeswoman Olivia Damavandi said.

The Los Angeles County Department of Beaches and Harbors was not responsible for disposing of the more than 40-foot body, said Carol Baker, who represents the agency.

"It's on a private beach" controlled by homeowners down to the high tide line and the state is responsible for the tidelands, Baker said.

The young male fin whale washed up Monday between Paradise Cove and Point Dume, near the homes of the rich and famous, including Streisand and Bob Dylan.

The whale may have been hit by a ship and had a gash to its back and a damaged spine, according to results of a necropsy conducted Tuesday by the wildlife center.

"It's relatively common for it to happen. It's really unfortunate," Reyes told the Los Angeles Times.

Such accidents have become more common as increased numbers of migrating blue, fin and humpback whales swim to California's shore to feast on shrimp-like krill.

Fin whales are endangered and about 2,300 live along the West Coast. They're the second-largest species of whale after blue whales and can grow up to 85 feet, weigh up to 80 tons and live to be 90 years old.

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