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Utah boy brought gun for protection
A Utah sixth-grader caught with a gun at school told administrators he brought the weapon to defend himself in case of an attack similar to last week’s mass shooting at a Connecticut school, officials said Tuesday.
The 11-year-old was being held in juvenile detention on suspicion of possessing a dangerous weapon and aggravated assault after other students at the suburban Salt Lake City elementary school told police he threatened them with the handgun.
Granite School District spokesman Ben Horsley said teachers confronted the boy and found an unloaded gun and ammunition in his backpack, Horsley said. The boy told others his parents sent him to school with the gun for protection, which his parents adamantly deny, Horsley said. Maryland student deemed threat to others
Maryland police say a high school student was committed to a hospital’s psychiatric ward after classmates reported feeling threatened and his parents said he had access to weapons.
Laurel police spokesman Pete Piringer said the youth was committed Monday after threatening to harm others and after his classmates complained about his disruptive behavior. Piringer said a teacher reported the complaints to a school security officer, who notified police.
Associated Press
Family and friends leave the wake of school shooting victim Victoria Soto, a teacher at Sandy Hook Elementary School, on Tuesday in Stratford, Conn.

Classes resume in Newtown

Grief, relief for schools except Sandy Hook

– Newtown returned its students to their classrooms Tuesday for the first time since last week’s massacre and faced the agonizing task of laying others to rest, as this grieving town wrestled with the same issues gripping the country: violence, gun control and finding a way forward.

Funerals were held for two more of the tiny fallen, a 6-year-old boy and a 6-year-old girl.

The resumption of classes at all Newtown’s schools except Sandy Hook brought a return of familiar routines, something students seemed to welcome as they arrived aboard buses festooned with large green-and-white ribbons – the colors of the stricken elementary school.

“We’re going to be able to comfort each other and try and help each other get through this, because that’s the only way we’re going to do it,” said 17-year-old P.J. Hickey, a senior at Newtown High School. “Nobody can do this alone.”

Still, he noted: “There’s going to be no joy in school. It really doesn’t feel like Christmas anymore.”

Tensions in the shattered community ran high as the grief of parents and townspeople collided with the crush of media reporting on the shootings and the funerals.

Police walked children to parents waiting in cars to protect them from the cameras. Many parents yelled at reporters to leave their children and the town alone.

At Newtown High School, students in sweat shirts and jackets, many wearing headphones, had mixed reactions. Some waved at or snapped photos of the assembled media horde, while others appeared visibly shaken.

Students said they didn’t get much work done Tuesday and spent much of the day talking about the terrible events of Friday morning, when 20-year-old Adam Lanza, clad all in black, broke into Sandy Hook Elementary and opened fire on students and staff.

“It’s definitely better than just sitting at home watching the news,” sophomore Tate Schwab said. “It really hasn’t sunk in yet. It feels to me like it hasn’t happened.”

As for concerns about safety, some students were defiant.

“This is where I feel the most at home,” Hickey said. “I feel safer here than anywhere else in the world.”

Still, some parents were apprehensive.

Priscilla and Randy Bock, arriving with their 15-year-old special needs son, James, expressed misgivings. “I was not sure we wanted him going,” Priscilla Bock said. “I’m a mom. I’m anxious.”

“Is there ever a right day? I mean, you just do it, you know, just get them back to school,” Peter Muckell said as he took 8-year-old daughter Shannon, a third-grader, to Hawley Elementary.

At one Newtown school, students found some comfort from Ronan, an Australian shepherd therapy dog from Good Dog Foundation in New York.

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