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Seahawks corner’s suspension tossed out

Sherman

– Even when others were suggesting he drop his case and accept his punishment, Richard Sherman never strayed from his steadfast belief that his four-game suspension would be overturned.

As unlikely as it seemed, Sherman was right.

The Seattle Seahawks will now have one of the best young cornerbacks in the NFL available for the playoffs after Sherman won his appeal of a suspension for use of performance enhancing substances Thursday.

Gone is the lingering question about a possible suspension that hung over Sherman and the Seahawks for more than a month.

“I know what the truth is and anybody else who knows anything knows what the truth is. The truth has been told today,” Sherman said.

The decision that was made by former NFL executive Bob Wallace came early Thursday.

NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said in an email the league is reviewing the decision but was declining comment due to confidentiality provisions.

Sherman’s appeal was based on errors in the chain of custody of his urine sample and that there were mistakes made by the tester.

His appeal took place late last week in St. Louis.

A copy of Wallace’s decision was obtained by The Associated Press. In his explanation, Wallace writes that the collection process of Sherman’s urine sample on Sept. 17, the day after Seattle beat Dallas in Week 2, was not ordinary.

According to the written decision, Sherman’s sample cup began leaking, to which the tester grabbed another cup and transferred the sample.

Documentation of the leaking cup was not originally on the submitted report following the test and only when asked by a supervisor in October did the tester acknowledge the sample being transferred from the original cup.

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