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Music

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Interscope Records

Freshcuts

‘Finally Rich’ Chief Keef

Rapper Chief Keef made major noise with his omnipresent song “I Don’t Like,” but those three words also describe my thoughts on his major label debut.

Unfortunately, the Chicago native fails to follow up on his great single in so many ways on “Finally Rich.” He has several good guest appearances with Rick Ross, 50 Cent, Young Jeezy and Wiz Khalifa, and the production is solid with Young Chop helming most of the 12-track set. But it’s not enough to save this woeful album.

The 17-year-old rapper’s simple rhymes lack creativity and it’s a struggle to understand his words.

‘Vicious Lies and Dangerous Rumors’ Big Boi

Big Boi is artistic throughout his sophomore solo album, taking risks by meshing electro sounds with his raps and singing. But this collection doesn’t sound like Flo Rida or Pitbull. This is classic.

“Vicious Lies and Dangerous Rumors” is a 14-track set that is full of gems, and flows from the intro “Ascending” to the closing track “Descending,” with Little Dragon. And what’s in between is just as great, including “Raspberries,” “Thom Pettie” and “The Thickets.”

Another treasure is “CPU,” featuring Phantogram, an indie pop group that consists of singer Sarah Barthel and vocalist-guitarist Josh Carter.

It’s a sonically upbeat song with Big Boi rapping about the new age of technology, while Barthel sings her airy vocals.

– Jonathan Landrum Jr., Associated Press

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