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Associated Press
Panasonic’s newest televisions are on display at the 2013 International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

Ultrawide, ultrathin TVs pack pixels at tech show

So clear as to show every blade of grass

– Televisions wider than sedans and thinner than a deck of cards will be on display at the International Consumer Electronics Show this week.

They will be packed with so many more pixels that individual blades of grass will stand out on a football field, as will every nip, tuck and wrinkle on celebrities.

Computer screens will be small enough to fit on your wrist and durable enough to be stitched into clothing. They will come in flexible plastics that can bend and twist so that an e-book can be cupped in the palm of your hand.

America’s seemingly endless appetite for new gadgets has fueled a boom in device innovation, particularly the size and quality of TVs and mobile electronics’ screens.

Electronics-makers will showcase these products as they try to play catch-up to the breakthroughs by Apple and Google, which have made the tablet and smartphone must-have wares. Those firms are working on wearable tech, such as Internet-connected glasses, driverless cars and smartphone watches.

But you won’t see much of that innovation at the world’s largest tech show, where leading Silicon Valley giants rarely introduce new products amid a flood of competing tech news.

Instead, rivals Samsung, Intel, Sony, LG and Microsoft will dominate the tech show-and-tell with a slew of whiz-bang products – often improvements on familiar technology – meant to keep consumers buying new gear.

But do consumers want to pay up to $20,000 for an extra 6 million pixels? There is very limited content available for the super-definition technology, companies say.

“It’s a multiscreen world, and the trend is that they’re all connected,” said Michael Gartenberg, a Gartner Research analyst.

Many of the products on display at the International CES won’t make it to retail, if the past is any guide. But the companies are scrambling to come up with products to pique customers’ interest.

Consumers own nearly six devices, on average, compared with four gadgets five years ago, according to the Yankee Group research firm. And that number is expected to rise.

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