You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Business

  • Fort Wayne ranks No. 11 on Forbes list of Opportunity Cities
    Forbes has ranked Fort Wayne No. 11 on its list of Opportunity Cities. The 19-city list, published Thursday, put Columbus, Ohio, at the top.
  • Alibaba stock soars 40% in massive IPO
    NEW YORK – Alibaba debuted as a publicly traded company Friday and swiftly climbed more than 40 percent in a mammoth IPO that offered eager investors seemingly unlimited potential for growth and a way to tap into the burgeoning Chinese
  • China levies record fine
    BEIJING – Drug giant Glaxo­SmithKline was fined $492 million Friday for bribing doctors in China in the biggest such penalty ever imposed by a Chinese court.
Advertisement

Target plans year-round online price-match policy

– Target Corp. is pledging to match prices of select online rivals year-round, a move that underscores how physical and online retailing are being meshed together.

Matching online prices is rare but expected to become more common as shoppers move increasingly online. Target, the nation’s second largest discounter behind Wal-Mart Stores Inc., said it will match prices that customers find on identical products at top online retailers, all the time.

The online list includes Amazon.com as well as the websites of Wal-Mart, Best Buy, Toys R Us and Babies R Us.

Target’s move follows a similar holiday price match that began Nov. 1 and ended Dec. 16. Target is also making permanent its holiday offer of matching prices of items found at its stores with those on its website. And for the first time, it will include products that are out of stock on Target.com.

The moves follow a disappointing holiday shopping season for the Minneapolis-based retailer, hurt by stiffer competition from online rivals and stores like Wal-Mart that have hammered on low prices. It’s also the latest step from brick-and-mortar stores to combat “showrooming” – a growing trend for customers to browse stores to check out products, and then go online to buy the same products for less.

Mark Schindele, Target senior vice president of merchandising operations, said the discounter monitors prices of 30,000 items, and thousands more online, to ensure it’s competitive. But Target says it had to do more to give shoppers more confidence.

“We believe that our prices are competitive year-round,” Schindele said. “We also know that our guests shop in many ways.”

Advertisement