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Associated Press
Frost covers fruit and leaves in an orange orchard near Sanger, Calif., where several nights of freezing temperatures have damaged citrus crops.
Briefs

Boy guilty in father’s slaying

– A boy who was only 10 when he fatally shot his white supremacist father was convicted Monday of second-degree murder by a judge who said the child knew what he did was wrong.

Riverside Superior Court Judge Jean Leonard weighed the severity of the crime against whether the amount of abuse and neglect suffered by the boy, now 12, played a significant role in the slaying of 32-year-old Jeff Hall, a regional leader of the National Socialist Movement.

Leonard noted the boy lay in bed, waited for the right moment and shot his dad at point-blank range with the “bad gun” – a .357 Magnum – while he slept on a sofa in the family home.

Defense attorney Matthew Hardy said that because of the abuse, his client learned it was acceptable to kill people who were a threat. The boy thought if he shot his dad, the violence would end, Hardy said.

Nation

Aging ex-con details Hoffa burial plans

A man convicted of crimes as a reputed Mafia captain has come forward with claims that missing Teamsters boss Jimmy Hoffa was buried in suburban Detroit.

Tony Zerilli was in prison when Hoffa disappeared from a Detroit-area restaurant in 1975, but he tells New York TV station WNBC that he was informed about Hoffa’s whereabouts after his release. The ailing 85-year-old took a WDIV reporter to a field near Rochester, north of Detroit, but no exact location was disclosed. The report was also aired on Detroit’s WDIV.

“The master plan was ... they were going to put him in a shallow grave here,” Zerilli said. “Then, they were going to take him from here to Rogers City upstate. There was a hunting lodge and they were going to bury in a shallow grave, then take him up there for final burial. Then, I understand, that it just fell through.”

Father, sons freeze to death on hike

An Air Force veteran known as an experienced hiker has died, along with his two young sons, after apparently getting lost on a desolate Missouri trail in heavy rain and rapidly plunging temperatures.

Reynolds County Sheriff Tom Volner says 36-year-old David Decareaux of Millstadt, Ill., and his 8- and 10-year-old sons were found Sunday, a day after they ventured out on the trail, about 110 miles southwest of St. Louis. Decareaux died at the scene, and the boys were declared dead at a hospital.

Volner says Decareaux knew the trail but apparently took a wrong turn and was ill-equipped for temperatures that sank from 60 degrees to the 20s.

West Coast freeze threatens citrus crop

As an unusual cold gripped the West Coast for the fifth day, some California citrus growers began to see damage Monday while strong winds added to the misery of bundled-up city residents.

In the San Joaquin Valley, where farmers are fighting to protect about $1.5 billion worth of citrus fruit on their trees, Sunday temperatures dropped to 25 degrees in some areas and stayed low longer than previous nights.

Insulin pens re-used at veterans hospital

Federal authorities warned against the infection risks of using insulin pens on more than one patient, and officials Monday asked why a veterans hospital in Buffalo, N.Y., may have used the pens on many patients, causing an HIV scare.

More than 700 patients admitted to the Veterans Affairs Western New York Healthcare System over a two-year period may have been exposed to HIV and hepatitis B and C, officials said after a review that found that multi-dose pens intended for use by a single patient may have been used on more than one person.

Although the needles were changed, the stored insulin could have been contaminated by a back flow of blood with each use, experts said.

No right to secede, White House says

Bad news for thousands of people who wanted to see Texas secede: The state is still in the U.S.

The White House has responded to a petition asking that Texas be allowed to break away from the country, saying the Founding Fathers who created the nation “did not provide a right to walk away from it.”

More than 125,000 people signed the petition, which was created a few days after President Obama won re-election. The White House has promised to respond to any petition that gets more than 25,000 signatures within 30 days.

In asking that Texas be allowed to leave the country, the petition cited the “economic difficulties stemming from the federal government’s neglect to reform domestic and foreign spending.”

World

Derailment kills 19, injures 100 in Egypt

Egypt’s state news agency says 19 people have been killed and more than 100 injured when two railroad passenger cars derailed just south of Cairo.

The official MENA news agency quoted Health Ministry officials as saying that the 107 wounded were being treated in hospitals near the site of the accident in Giza’s Badrasheen neighborhood. The train was carrying army recruits when it jumped the track Monday evening.

Pakistanis throng for rising politician

Thousands of Pakistanis fed up with a government they say is corrupt and indifferent to the plight of common citizens descended on the capital Monday, responding to the call of a charismatic cleric who has quickly become a powerful but mysterious political force.

The dramatic entry into Pakistani politics of Tahir-ul-Qadri, a preacher who until recently lived in Canada, has sparked concern from some that he is seeking to derail elections expected this spring at the behest of the powerful army.

Qadri has denied those allegations and insisted his vaguely worded demands for election reform are simply meant to root out corruption in the political system. He pledged several weeks ago to lead a “million-man march” on Islamabad on Monday to press his demands.

‘Professional’ tunnel in Berlin bank heist

German police say robbers dug a 100-foot tunnel into the safe deposit room of a Berlin bank and escaped with their haul, setting a fire as they left to cover their tracks.

Berlin police spokesman Thomas Neuendorf says the tunnel led from an underground garage into the bank’s safe deposit room.

Neuendorf told The Associated Press Monday that the tunnel was “very professional” and must have taken weeks or even months to complete. It was elaborately constructed and even had ceiling supports.

Thousands stranded at Tokyo airport

Tokyo’s Narita International Airport operator says 3,400 travelers spent the night in the terminal after snow caused airlines to cancel 71 flights.

In the season’s first snowfall in the Japanese capital, about 3 inches of snow fell in central Tokyo and around Narita on Monday – a national holiday in Japan.

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