You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

News

  • Lotteries
  • Storm disrupts holiday travel
    Thanksgiving travelers scrambled to change their plans and set out early ahead of a storm expected to bring snow, slush and rain to the crowded Washington-to-Boston corridor today.
  • Students protest Okla. rape case
    NORMAN, Okla. – Allegations by three girls at a central Oklahoma high school that they were raped by the same male student have led to a police investigation, and on Monday brought protests by students who say school officials have
Advertisement

US relying more on drones in Afghanistan

Despite targeted hits, civilian toll increases in ’12

– The number of U.S. drone strikes in Afghanistan rose sharply last year compared with 2011, the United Nations said Tuesday.

The increase was a sign that unmanned aircraft are taking a greater role as Americans try to streamline the fight against insurgents while preparing to withdraw combat forces in less than two years.

Drones have become a major source of contention between the U.S. and countries like Pakistan, where covert strikes on militant leaders have drawn condemnation and allegations of sovereignty infringements as family members and other bystanders are killed.

They have not been a prominent issue in Afghanistan, however.

While drone attacks have occurred, they have largely been in support of ground troops during operations and have not been singled out by President Hamid Karzai’s administration in its campaign against international airstrikes.

The steep rise in the number of “weapons fired from unmanned aerial aircraft” – the formal term for drones – raises the possibility that may change as U.S. forces become more dependent on such attacks to fight al-Qaida and other insurgents, with combat missions due to end by the end of 2014.

The U.N. mission in Afghanistan said 506 weapons were released by drones in 2012, compared with 294 the previous year.

The U.S. Air Force Central Command also recorded an increase in drone use, giving the numbers of weapons released by drones as 243 in 2009, 277 in 2010, 294 in 2011 and 494 in 2012.

Drones are highly effective, and most nations have given Washington at least tacit agreement to carry out the attacks.

Five attacks in 2012 resulted in casualties, with 16 civilians killed and three wounded, up from just one deadly attack in 2011, according to the U.N. Georgette Gagnon, the head of human rights for the U.N. mission in Afghanistan, said it was the first year the U.N. had tried to document civilian casualties from drones.

The U.N. said most civilian casualties from drone strikes appeared to be the result of weapons aimed directly at insurgents, but some may have been targeting errors. It cited the example of four boys killed Oct. 20 in Logar province when a drone struck after a clash between pro-government forces and insurgents a few miles away from the area.

The U.N. mission called for a review of tactical and operational policy on targeting to ensure compliance with international humanitarian law “with the expansion of the use of unmanned combat aerial vehicles” in Afghanistan.

George Little, a Pentagon spokesman, said the U.S. works hard to protect civilians.

“We take great care with our unmanned systems to conduct very precise targeting in Afghanistan, and we will continue to do so. When there are mishaps, we take steps to work closely with the government of Afghanistan and the affected individuals to express our concerns,” he said in Washington.

The U.N. figures were released as part of its annual report on civilian casualties in Afghanistan.

Overall, the full-year toll of civilian deaths in 2012 declined to 2,754, a 12 percent decrease from 3,131 in the same period a year earlier. It was the first time in six years that the civilian death toll dropped.

But the toll spiked in the second half of the year as weather improved, compared with the same period in 2011, suggesting that Afghanistan is likely to face continued violence as the Taliban and other militants fight for control after the impending withdrawal of U.S. and allied combat forces.

Conflict-related violence struck more women and girls last year as well, with 301 killed and 563 wounded – a 20 percent increase from 2011, the report said.

The United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan said civilian casualties rose 13 percent to 4,431 in the second half of the year, including more from roadside bombs in public areas, compared with the same period in 2011.

That included 1,599 people killed and 2,832 wounded from July 1 to Dec. 31, a jump from 1,556 and 2,832 respectively in the same period the previous year.

Advertisement