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Expert says food aids longevity of brain

We love our hearts. But what are our brains – chopped liver?

Neal Barnard, an adjunct associate professor of medicine at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, says how we eat can improve not just the function of our tickers, but also the longevity of our noggins.

In his new book, “Power Foods for the Brain” ($27), and his PBS special, “Protect Your Memory,” he outlines his nutrition plan to stave off Alzheimer’s and dementia.

Walnuts: Vitamin E can be a brain booster; the best sources are nuts and seeds.

Blueberries: Barnard is fond of this antioxidant-rich fruit that’s been shown (in a small study) to help people with memory problems.

Broccoli: In combination with vitamins B6 and B12, it can eliminate homocysteine – a destructive molecule that messes with the heart and brain.

Sweet potatoes: Wondering how to get your B6? Throw some of these root veggies into your basket.

Wine: A glass or two a night has been shown to cut Alzheimer’s risk significantly.

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