You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Colleges

  • Heisman winner investigated for BB gun in 2012
    Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Winston and Florida State teammate Chris Casher were held at gunpoint by campus police nearly two years ago while hunting squirrels with a pellet gun, police say.
  • Just say no to signing day
    If Nebraska coach Bo Pelini had his way, National Signing Day would be a thing of the past. And the result would be an improved recruiting process.
  • NCAA settles head-injury lawsuit
    The NCAA agreed on Tuesday to help athletes with head injuries in a proposed settlement of a class-action lawsuit that college sports’ governing body touted as a major step forward but that critics say doesn’t go nearly far enough.
Advertisement
Associated Press
Harvard guard Siyani Chambers celebrates after the Crimson beat New Mexico in the NCAA tournament Thursday in Salt Lake City.

Harvard win one for books

Upset of New Mexico 1st win ever in tourney

– Michael Lesley crisscrossed Harvard Yard, looking up from his copy of David Hume’s “The Natural History of Religion” only to avoid the tourists that shuffled through the snow-covered quadrangle.

Did he bother to watch Harvard’s victory over No. 10 New Mexico on Thursday night, the first NCAA tournament win in school history? No.

Will Lesley, a fourth-year doctoral student in religion, tune in when the Crimson play Arizona for a spot in the Sweet 16 today?

“Absolutely. Are you kidding me?” he said on Friday afternoon, a day after the Ivy League champions upset the third-seeded and heavily favored Lobos 68-62 in Salt Lake City.

Harvard undergraduates are on spring break this week, but that didn’t stop the Harvard community from celebrating the victory.

“They did a good job, man, I’m happy for them,” Houston Rockets point guard Jeremy Lin, the biggest basketball star to come out of Harvard, said after the NBA team’s shootaround on Friday morning. “It’s a great win. They made history.”

Harvard President Drew Gilpin Faust was in Seoul giving a speech during the game, but a spokesman said she followed the second half closely and called coach Tommy Amaker to congratulate him and the team and wish them luck in the next round.

Senior Molly Stansik missed the game because she was on a flight back from a spring break trip to Puerto Rico. There were eight or nine other Harvard students on the plane, and one of them was able to stream the basketball game on his computer.

“I could hear him across the plane,” Stansik said. “Everyone was screaming and reacting accordingly.”

Although it has been quiet on campus with the undergrads on break, Lesley watched as the students were able to bond over social media. He followed the reaction on Facebook and said, “Everyone’s rather thrilled.”

“At a place like this, people are talking about the first win in 377 years, as if basketball has been around as long,” Lesley said with a chuckle. “There’s just a lot of unexpected pride.”

The oldest and most prestigious university in the nation, Harvard has produced a handful of U.S. presidents, dozens of Nobel Laureates and enough bankers, lawyers and politicians (and comedy writers) to prompt the Harvard Lampoon to tweet after the game: “America, we are sorry for messing up your brackets and also your financial system and everything else.”

Advertisement