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Food

  • A sense for food
    Christine Ha has three words for those who wonder how a blind person such as herself is able to cook.They’re French words, of course.
  • New wines reaching Americans
    Fancy some furmint? How about a nice glass of grillo? If you’ve never heard of either, chances are you will. Wine lists are getting a makeover as producers all over the world make a play for U.S. palates.
  • Baking fails
    Jennifer Bloom has been baking for a while – most lately in a home-based baking business called Cupcakes and Muffins and More, Oh My! in Fort Wayne.
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Learning knife cuts

There are a lot of ways to slice. Make prep time easy by learning to make rounds, half-moons and slice on the bias.

Slicing rounds

Rounds are coin-shaped pieces sliced from something cylindrical, such as a zucchini or a carrot.

To make rounds, steady what you’re cutting and make sure your fingers are tucked under.

Rest the knife against your knuckles, walk your fingers back and slice with a continuous motion. The thickness is determined by how far back you move your fingers between slices.

Half-moons

To make half-moons, slice in half lengthwise. Lay the flat side down and slice across. That’s all there is to it!

Slicing on the bias

A bias cut simply means cutting on the diagonal. Hold your food at a slight angle to the knife and slice. Bias cuts are often used in Asian stir-fry.

Chopping

When a recipe calls for something to be chopped, it means roughly the same size, but it’s not important to be precise.

First, slice a pepper into strips. Then, turn the strips 90 degrees and slice across the strips again. Done!

Mincing

Mincing is taking something that is roughly chopped and then chopping it finely.

Put one hand flat on top of the knife while moving the knife over the chopped pile. Occasionally, use the heel of the knife to gather the pile back together. This will work for a recipe that calls for finely chopped or minced ingredients.

– Food Network Kitchens

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