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Gary Varvel l Indianapolis Star

Furthermore …

Error on home rule corrected

State lawmakers made good on a promise to remedy the harm to home rule they had inadvertently caused with a recently passed piece of legislation.

In March, both chambers passed a bill with the goal of setting uniform rules for employee wages and benefits across the state.

But according to many legal experts, Senate Enrolled Act 213 also nullified several local ordinances, including Fort Wayne’s against discrimination based on sexual orientation.

When the issue was brought to light, Gov. Mike Pence promised to work with lawmakers to ensure the oversight was fixed.

The correction came in a short, but crucial, line added to the budget bill and passed in the early morning just before the General Assembly session ended.

Ballard going to bat for Indianapolis cricket

Some Indianapolis residents are scratching their heads over Mayor Greg Ballard’s proposal to make the Circle City known for cricket. Yes, that’s cricket, not crickets.

“When people around the world think of cricket, I want them to think of Indianapolis,” Ballard told The Times of India during a recent trade trip. The newspaper reported the mayor wants to build a stadium, although a spokesman for Ballard said the plan is for outdoor fields that meet the international standards for the game.

The plan has apparently been in the works since 2011, when a park on the city’s east side hosted a local tournament at two fields there.

Early this month, the city will accept bids to build three to four more fields, a walking trail and more parking on a nearly 50-acre site named World Sports Park. Completion is expected in fall 2014. The fields will accommodate cricket, rugby, lacrosse and hurling, believed to be the oldest field game.

Some Marion County residents, irritated with continuing efforts to use tax dollars to support Indianapolis’ professional sports venues, are chafing at the mayor’s proposal. Ballard, however, defends the plan by pointing to a growing cricket community – including immigrants from India, Pakistan, England, Australia and South Africa who have relocated here.

A far-fetched plan? Maybe – but a proposal to make Indianapolis the amateur sports capital of the world once sounded far-fetched.

A day set aside to acknowledge the dangers of journalism

Today is World Press Freedom Day, set aside to honor and recognize journalists throughout the world who have been killed or imprisoned because of their attempts to keep the public informed.

And according to the International Press Institute, this past year has been the deadliest year for journalists since the organization began tracking deaths in 1997.

There were 133 journalists killed in 2012, an increase of 53 deaths when compared to 2011. The organization also reports that 35 journalists have been killed so far in 2013.

The Committee to Protect Journalists reports that another 232 journalists were imprisoned.

It’s important to note that these troubling numbers do not include bloggers or citizen journalists whose lives were at risk but played such crucial roles using social media to shed light on the activities of dictatorial regimes.

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