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Vehicle crash deaths high for returning vets

For men and women who have fought in the country’s wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, death behind the wheel is becoming another lethal aftereffect of combat.

After they leave military service, veterans of the two wars have a 75 percent higher rate of fatal motor vehicle accidents than do civilians. Troops still in uniform have a higher risk of crashing their cars in the months immediately after returning from deployment than in the months immediately before. People who have had multiple tours to combat zones are at highest risk for traffic accidents.

The most common explanation is that soldiers bring back driving habits that were lifesaving in war zones but are dangerous on America’s roads. They include racing through intersections, straddling lanes, swerving on bridges and, for some, not wearing seat belts because they hinder a rapid escape.

That’s probably not the whole story, however. Post-traumatic stress disorder, suffered by thousands of veterans, increases aggressive driving. Drunken driving and thrill-seeking are also more common after combat, according to studies and the testimony of many veterans.

Motor vehicle crashes have long been a serious problem in the armed services. From 1999 through 2012, a period spanning peacetime and the two wars, as many active-duty military personnel died in non-combat motor vehicle crashes both on and off duty (4,423) as were killed in the Iraq war (4,409).

“Before suicides became the leading cause of non-battle injuries, motor vehicle injuries were,” said Bruce Jones, a physician and epidemiologist who heads the Army’s injury prevention program at Aberdeen Proving Ground, in Maryland.

War, however, worsens the problem. Men who served in the wars in Iraq or Afghanistan have a 76 percent higher rate of dying in vehicle crashes, and women a 43 percent higher rate, than similar people in the general population, according to an unpublished study by Han Kang, an epidemiologist with the Department of Veterans Affairs. The same phenomenon was seen in Gulf War veterans.

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