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A Fort Wayne-based company that offered to arrange shipment of Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s body to Russia is satisfied that the suspected Boston Marathon bomber has been buried at an undisclosed location.
“We are, I guess you could say, relieved that the situation has come to a resolution,” said Kevin Erb, speaking on behalf of Eagle’s Wings Air.
Although its name sounds like an airline, Eagle’s Wings is a logistics company that arranges shipment of bodies for burial. Its staff finds the best available flight, based on timing and cost, Erb said Thursday afternoon.
Frank Kaiser, Eagle’s Wings president and CEO, extended the offer to the Graham Putnam & Mahoney Funeral Parlors of Worcester, Mass., because his company was one of the few that could show such support to the funeral home that provided services despite public protests.
Kaiser didn’t receive direct feedback from the funeral home, Erb said, but officials are confident the Massachusetts funeral director knew of the offer.
“We’re pretty sure his hands were tied,” said Erb, who works for Ferguson Advertising.
– Sherry Slater, The Journal Gazette
Associated Press
Former Sen. Joseph Lieberman, I-Conn., left, and Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis testify to the House Homeland Security Committee.

Police left in dark about bomber

Chief: Boston not told of FBI investigation

– The FBI did not initially share with Boston police the warnings from Russia’s security service in 2011 about one suspect in last month’s marathon bombings, despite the work of four city police representatives on a federal terrorism task force, Boston’s police commissioner told Congress on Thursday.

Yet Commissioner Ed Davis acknowledged that police might not have uncovered or disrupted the plot even if they had fully investigated the family of Tamerlan Tsarnaev based on those warnings. The FBI after a cursory investigation closed its assessment on Tsarnaev, who died in a police shootout after the bombings. Boston police learned about the Russian warnings only later.

“That’s very hard to say. We would certainly look at the information, we would certainly talk to the individual,” Davis said. “From the information I’ve received, the FBI did that, and they closed the case out. I can’t say that I would have come to a different conclusion based upon the information that was known at that particular time.”

In Massachusetts, meanwhile, Tsarnaev was secretly buried in an undisclosed location outside Worcester after a weeklong search for a community willing to take the body. Worcester police Sgt. Kerry Hazelhurst said the body was no longer in that city and had been entombed, but he would not say where.

The congressional hearing was the first in a series to review the government’s initial response to the attacks, ask what information authorities received about Tsarnaev and his brother before the bombings and consider whether it was handled correctly.

Some lawmakers questioned whether Boston police could have more thoroughly investigated Tsarnaev after 2011, based on Russia’s vague warnings to the FBI and CIA or the discovery by the Homeland Security Department in 2012 that he was traveling to Russia for six months, and whether Justice Department rules intended to protect civil liberties constrained the FBI’s own inquiry.

“Why didn’t they involve the local law enforcers who could have stayed on the case and picked up signals from some of the students who interacted with them, from the people in the mosque,” asked former Sen. Joe Lieberman, who also testified. “In this case, aggravatingly, you have two of our great homeland security agencies that didn’t involve before the event the local and state authorities that could have helped us prevent the attack.”

Davis’ testimony revealed a gap in information-sharing between federal and local officials. That was somewhat reminiscent of intelligence failures that preceded the 2001 terror attacks. But unlike those lapses, it’s not clear anything would have been different, whatever coordination there might have been.

Led by the FBI, Joint Terrorism Task Forces operate in many cities as a way to bring federal, state and local officials together to share information. The model has existed for decades but, after 9/11, task forces sprouted up in cities nationwide to ensure that police were not out of the loop on investigations like the one the FBI conducted into Tsarnaev.

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