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Education chief eyes later school-day start

– A later start to the school day could help teenagers get the most from their classroom time and local districts should consider delaying the first bell, Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Wednesday.

School districts would still be free to set their own start times, Duncan insisted in a broadcast interview, but he pointed to research that backs up his comments that rested students are ready students.

Duncan said he would not be telling local school leaders when their first bells should ring and said it was up to local leaders to make the decisions on their own.

“There’s lots of research and common sense that lots of teens struggle to get up ... to get on the bus,” said Duncan, former chief of Chicago Public Schools.

The main reason?

“Teen brains have a different biology,” said Kyla Wahlstrom, director at the University of Minnesota’s Center for Applied Research and Education Improvement.

For the last 17 years, Wahlstrom has studied teenagers’ sleep cycles, brains and learning. She has concluded that schools that want ready students must have students arrive rested. Absenteeism, tardiness, depression, obesity, drop-out rates and even car crashes all decline when students head to school after a good night of sleep.

Schools are starting to take notice.

Take, for instance, Virginia’s Fairfax County Public Schools.

Most medical professionals recommend between 8.5 and 9.5 hours of sleep for students. The Fairfax district surveyed students in grades 8, 10 and 12 and found two-thirds of them were sleeping seven hours or less each school night.

That prompted the school district, the 11th largest in the country, to partner with the Children’s National Medical Center’s Division of Sleep Medicine to study students’ nighttime habits this year and to consider pushing its start time to 8 a.m. or later in coming years.

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