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Man charged with spreading HIV

– A Missouri man who told authorities he had sex with as many 300 people since being diagnosed with HIV pleaded not guilty Thursday to infecting another man with the virus, and prosecutors said more charges are expected.

David Mangum entered the plea after being charged with recklessly infecting another with HIV, which in Missouri – where sentences for such crimes are among the nation’s harshest – carries up to life in prison.

Court files allege that the 36-year-old told detectives in Dexter, a small town in southeast Missouri, that he had unprotected sex with as many as 300 partners since being diagnosed with the virus that causes AIDS. Up to 60 of those contacts allegedly occurred after he moved to Missouri two years ago from Dallas, where he has convictions for prostitution, indecent exposure and public lewdness.

Many of his trysts stemmed from Craigslist ads, he told investigators, and he would meet up with men at parks, truck stops and other remote locations. Police believe many were truckers or others passing through the region, and because Mangum had little information about many of the men, investigators are concerned about finding potential victims.

“First names with no phone numbers or addresses – that’s going to be a challenge,” Dexter police Detective Cory Mills said.

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