You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

News

  • (No heading)
    After nearly four years of one-party rule in Indiana, it seems only fair to examine how the Statehouse club management is doing.
  • Kansas senator battling for political life
     LAWRENCE, Kan. – Sen. Pat Roberts of Kansas took his conservative re-election message into the state’s swing-voting east Saturday in his latest effort chip away any advantage from independent candidate Greg Orman in a U.
  • Wildfire still too intense to assess
    Assessment teams sought Saturday to find out just how many structures have been damaged or destroyed by a massive wildfire that threatens thousands of homes in Northern California.
Advertisement

Expected effects

A partial government shutdown will have far-reaching consequences for some but minimal impact on others. A look at how services will be affected with Congress’ failure to reach an agreement averting a government shutdown Monday:

•All national parks will be closed, as would the Smithsonian museums, including the National Zoo in Washington.

•About 800,000 federal workers, many already reeling from the effect of automatic budget cuts, will be ordered to report to work today for about four hours – but only to carry out shutdown-related chores such as changing office voicemail messages and completing time cards.

•The Food and Drug Administration will suspend most routine safety inspections.

•Federal occupational safety and health inspectors will stop workplace inspections except in cases of imminent danger.

•A small number of Head Start programs will feel the impact right away. If the shutdown continues, more programs will be affected.

•The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, known as WIC, could shut down.

•Medical research at the National Institutes of Health will be disrupted and some studies will be delayed. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be severely limited in spotting or investigating disease outbreaks.

•Veterans appealing a denial of disability benefits will have to wait longer for a decision, because the appeals board would not issue any decisions during a shutdown.

•Many low-to-moderate-income borrowers and first-time homebuyers seeking government-insured mortgages could face delays.

Advertisement