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Associated Press
Mexican youth raised in the U.S. chant slogans outside a migrant shelter before crossing the international bridge from Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.
Nation/World

Migrants march across US border

– Nearly three dozen migrants marched across the U.S.-Mexico border without papers Monday, the latest group of a younger generation brought to the U.S. illegally as children that seeks to confront head-on immigration policies they consider unjust.

Wearing a colorful array of graduation-style caps and gowns, 34 young people who spent long stretches of their childhoods in U.S. cities like Phoenix and Boston chanted “undocumented and unafraid” as they crossed the Rio Grande into Texas.

At the heart of their protest, and that of a similar group that crossed the border in Arizona in July, was a change to U.S. immigration regulations made in June 2012. Immigrants who were brought to the country illegally as children were granted opportunity to apply for a renewable two-year deferment and work authorization.

But the young people crossing Monday had left the U.S., either voluntarily or through deportation, months, weeks or even just days before the announcement, and so were not eligible.

Venezuela president kicks out US officials

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro announced Monday the expulsion of the top U.S. diplomat in Venezuela and two other embassy employees for allegedly conspiring with “the extreme right” to sabotage the economy and power grid.

The U.S. Embassy said it had not yet received notification but called the accusations unfounded.

Maduro said they had 48 hours to leave the country. “Out of Venezuela,” the leftist leader shouted, then added in English: “Yankees go home!”

Maduro did not offer any details on the diplomats’ alleged transgressions other than to say they met with opposition and labor leaders in the southwestern state of Bolivar, which is home to a number of troubled state-owned foundries and Venezuela’s main hydroelectric plant.

Infant bed-sharing doubled since 90s

The government’s latest infant bed-sharing numbers show the percentage of U.S. babies sleeping with parents or another child more than doubled since the early 1990s, despite public health messages linking the practice with sudden infant death syndrome.

Nearly 14 percent of adults, mostly mothers, surveyed in 2010 said their infants usually shared a bed, either with parents or another child, instead of sleeping alone in a crib. That was up from about 7 percent in 1993, and the increase was mainly among blacks and Hispanics. The practice had leveled off among whites after an increase in the 1990s.

2 BASE-jump near World Trade Center

Security videotape shows two daredevils dressed in black floating in parachutes from a height of about 40 stories before landing on a street near the World Trade Center and disappearing into the night, police said Monday.

Investigators were studying that video and other footage to try to identify the parachutists and determine which high-rise they used for a leap around 3 a.m. Monday.

Police suspect the pair may have pulled off a stunt similar to that of three so-called BASE jumpers who in June climbed to the top of the Trump International Hotel & Tower in Chicago, North America’s second-tallest building, before parachuting to the ground and getting away.

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