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A committee of architects met to discuss a change to One World Trade Center, right, that may disqualify it from holding the title of the U.S.’s tallest behind Chicago’s Willis Tower.
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Jury still out on US’s tallest

– Rising from the ashes of 9/11, the new World Trade Center tower has punched above the New York skyline to reach its powerfully symbolic height of 1,776 feet and become the tallest building in the country. Or has it?

A committee of architects recognized as the arbiters on world building heights was meeting Friday to decide whether a design change affecting the skyscraper’s 408-foot needle disqualifies it from being counted. Disqualification would deny the tower the title as the nation’s tallest.

Without the needle, the building measures 1,368 feet, a number that also holds symbolic weight as the height of the original World Trade Center. The Willis – formerly Sears – Tower is 1,450-foot (not including antenna height).

Insurance to cover mental health healing

A new Obama administration rule requires insurers to cover treatment for mental health and substance abuse no differently than they do for physical illnesses.

The Obama administration had pledged to issue a final mental health parity rule as part of its effort to reduce gun violence.

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius says patients seeking mental health or substance abuse care have at time suffered discrimination through higher out-of-pocket costs or stricter limits on hospital stays or doctor visits.

Sebelius says nearly 60 percent of people with mental health conditions and nearly 90 percent with substance abuse disorders don’t receive the treatment they need.

Typhoon in Philippines kills more than 100

One of the strongest storms on record slammed into the central Philippines, killing more than 100 people whose bodies lay in the streets of one of the hardest-hit cities, an official said Saturday.

Nearly 750,000 people were forced to flee their homes and damage was believed to be extensive. Weather officials said Haiyan had sustained winds of 147 mph with gusts of 170 mph when it made landfall.

Syrian opposition group to duck Moscow talks

Syria’s main Western-backed opposition group has refused to participate in talks in Moscow with Syrian government organizations on resolving the country’s humanitarian crisis, the Russian Foreign Ministry and opposition figures said Friday.

Ministry spokesman Alexander Lukashevich said the Syrian National Coalition is “blocking and refusing to participate” in the talks. Russian officials had hoped the talks would bolster prospects for a proposed peace conference the U.S. and Russia are trying to convene in Geneva.

Forensics show Chilean poet not killed by poison

The four-decade mystery of whether Chilean Nobel Prize-winning poet Pablo Neruda was poisoned was seemingly cleared up on Friday, when forensic test results showed no chemical agents in his bones. But his family and driver were not satisfied and said they’ll request more proof.

Neruda died under suspicious circumstances in the chaos that followed Chile’s 1973 military coup. The official version is that the poet died of cancer. But Neruda’s former driver has said for years that dictatorship agents injected poison into the poet’s stomach while he was bedridden. Neruda’s body was exhumed in April to determine the cause of his death.

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