You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Economy

Advertisement

Home ownership rate climbs, fortifying real estate rebound

The U.S. homeownership rate climbed from the lowest level in 18 years, signaling that the real estate rebound is drawing in more buyers.

The share of Americans who own their homes was 65.3 percent in the third quarter, up from 65 percent in the previous three months, the Census Bureau reported last week.

The prior level was the lowest since the third quarter of 1995.

Rising real estate values are removing negative equity, helping homeowners avoid foreclosure while also luring would-be purchasers into the market before prices and mortgage rates go higher.

The pool of eligible buyers is expanding as U.S. employment improves and families who lost properties during the recession repair their credit and seek another chance at owning.

Americans whose properties were repossessed were once “homeowners by choice, and now they are renters by chance,” said Richard Smith, chief executive officer of Realogy Holdings Corp., which owns brokerage brands Coldwell Banker and Century 21.

“They will repair their credit and be back in the market as homebuyers,” he said in a telephone interview. “We don’t grow up in the country aspiring to be renters. We aspire to be owners.”

Home prices jumped 12 percent in September from a year earlier, the 19th consecutive annual increase, according to Irvine, Calif.-based CoreLogic Inc.

Minorities and young people are among the groups with the sharpest declines in homeownership since the crash. In the third quarter, the rate for blacks rose to 43.1 percent from 42.9 percent the previous quarter, Census Bureau data show. The rate for whites was unchanged at 73.3 percent.

The increase in the national homeownership rate was the first in a year. The measure peaked at 69.2 percent in 2004. The seasonally adjusted rate in the third quarter was 65.1 percent, unchanged from the previous three months.

“Today’s data could be interpreted as an early sign that mortgage buyers are finally beginning to make more of a contribution to the housing recovery,” said Ed Stansfield, chief property economist at Capital Economics Ltd. in London.

But it’s is too soon to call this a turning point, he said. Contracts to buy previously owned residences tumbled the most in three years in September as borrowing costs climbed, the National Association of Realtors reported last week.

Advertisement