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Associated Press
Bangladeshi shopkeepers sit on sacks at a wholesale market on the second day of a four-day general strike in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Monday.

Protests close clothes factories

Wage demands in Bangladesh add to chaotic conditions

– Thousands of workers demanding higher pay hurled rocks and sticks at clothing factories and clashed with police who used tear gas against them Monday, bringing fresh scrutiny to working conditions in Bangladesh’s garment industry. At least 30 people were reported wounded.

The South Asian nation has seen three weeks of bloody political protests, and the demonstrations by garment workers only added to the chaos.

A government-appointed panel voted last week to raise the minimum wage for millions of garment workers to $66.25 a month – a raise by 77 percent but still the lowest minimum wage in the world. The workers have rejected the proposal, demanding $100 instead.

Factory owners have not endorsed it either and argue the proposed wage for an unskilled newcomer would increase their production cost significantly and destroy the industry in a fiercely competitive global market.

Bangladesh, the world’s second-largest garment manufacturing country after China, earns more than $20 billion a year from garment exports, mainly to the United States and Europe. The sector employs about 4 million workers, mostly women.

The Ministry of Labor would still have to approve the proposed amount to make it a law.

Bangladesh’s garment industry has come under scrutiny for its often harsh and unsafe conditions after the collapse of a factory building killed more than 1,100 people in April. In another horrific case, a fire last November killed 112 workers.

Mustafizur Rahman, director of the Industrial Police, said thousands protested and at least 100 factories were closed Monday in the Ashulia and Savar industrial areas to avoid further violence after the clash started in the morning.

Rahman would not say if there were any injuries, but Somoy TV station said up to 30 people were injured.

“The situation is under control now, but there is no chance to resume work in factories today,” he said Monday. “We have remained alert.”

Another top police official of Dhaka district told The Associated Press by phone that they called in paramilitary border guards to aid police in the troubled areas as part of heightening security. The official spoke on condition of anonymity for safety reasons.

Monday was the second day of an 84-hour general strike that ends Wednesday.

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