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Furthermore …

Little River band salute

Who would have guessed 23 years ago that a fledgling group called the Little River Wetlands Project would end up restoring and protecting more than 1,000 acres of wetlands in northeast Indiana?

Well, maybe the founders.

James Barrett, Jane Dustin, Michael Grimshaw, Carl Hofer, Ronald James, Larry Lomison, Paul Mc- Afee, Keith McMahon, Richard Poor, Samuel Schwartz, Robert Weber and Ronald Zartman will be honored at 2 p.m. Saturday with – what else? – a hike. Founders McAfee, Poor, Schwartz and Zartman, as well as families of the founders, will dedicate a Founders’ Circle at Arrowhead Marsh, 8624 Aboite Road, Roanoke, and trek through the preserve.

Established in 1990, Little River Wetlands created Eagle Marsh, the largest nature preserve in Allen County. The project’s free nature education programs serve thousands of children and adults every year.

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