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At a glance
Old-line retailers are opening tech test labs in Silicon Valley. They include:
Target Corp.
Headquarters: Minneapolis.
Lab(s): 20 employees at a tech lab that opened in May in the historic Folgers Coffee Co. building in San Francisco.
Projects: Looking into how wearable gadgets like smartwatches can be used in the store.
Perks: Free munchies and a Nerf basketball net.
Kohl’s Corp.
Headquarters: Menomonee Falls, Wis.
Lab(s): Opened a tech office in April in Milpitas, Calif., with 40 employees.
Projects: Restructuring its online business.
Perks: A pool table and free coffee and tea.
American Eagle Outfitters Inc.
Headquarters: Pittsburgh.
Lab(s): Tech center in San Francisco opened in July with 20 people. It plans to hire 30 more by year’s end.
Projects: It’s consolidating personal data of its shoppers from email campaigns and loyal programs to better customize offers.
Perks: Free munchies.
QVC
Headquarters: West Chester, Pa.
Lab(s): Purchased Oodle, a social classified ads firm in San Mateo, Calif., in December 2012 and is developing its presence in social media around the startup.
Projects: Last month, it launched a social shopping channel, which takes its inspiration from social media site Pinterest.
Perks: Foosball table.
Associated Press
Andrea Rockers Wright, Walmart.com senior buyer for merchandise, center, shows clothing during a line review at the Walmart.com office in San Bruno, Calif.

Retailers open tech labs

Turn to Silicon Valley to stay atop trends, fend off Amazon

– Software engineers wearing jeans and flip-flops test the latest smartphone apps. Walls and windows double as whiteboards where ideas are jotted down. And a mini basketball net is in the center of it all.

At first glance, this workplace resembles any Silicon Valley startup. There’s just one exception: Target’s trademark red bull’s-eye at the entrance.

Target, Kohl’s and home-shopping network QVC are among a half dozen retailers opening technology test labs in the San Francisco area to do things like improve their websites and create mobile shopping apps. They’re setting up shop in modern spaces and competing for top Silicon Valley talent to replicate the creativity, culture and nimbleness of online startups.

The goal is to stay on top of tech trends and better compete with online rivals like Amazon.com that attract shoppers with convenient ordering and cheap prices. The labs are a shift for retailers, which like many older industries, have been slow to adapt to rapidly changing technology. But retailers say the labs are essential to satisfy shoppers who more often are buying on their PCs, tablets and smartphones.

“Consumers expect immediate gratification,” says Lori Schafer, executive adviser at SAS Institute, which creates software for retailers. As a result, she says retailers need to develop technology in weeks, instead of months or years.

Retailers are playing catch-up after several years of watching shoppers gradually move from physical stores to the Web. Online sales have grown from 5.9 percent of the $2.64 trillion in total retail sales in 2009 to 7.6 percent of the $3.1 trillion in revenue last year, according to Forrester Research.

The explosion of people using smartphones to shop has pushed stores to move faster. U.S. consumers are now spending more than half of their time on retailers’ websites using their smartphones and tablets, according to the National Retail Federation, a retail trade group.

Retailers knew they needed to figure out how to create online and mobile technology to please their shoppers. So they began looking to Silicon Valley, where they hoped to tap the talent, culture and creativity that come from tech giants like Facebook and Apple.

Wal-Mart, the world’s largest retailer, was the first to open a tech lab in Silicon Valley. Since opening Wal-MartLabs in San Bruno in 2011, the company has rolled out a number of technologies that it developed there.

One of the biggest projects? Wal-Mart rebuilt its website’s search engine, which launched in 2012. It can guess a customer’s intent when he or she types a term rather than just returning specific search results.

A search for “denim” yields results for “jeans” instead of products with “denim,” for example.

Wal-Mart’s mobile app also has been a big focus at Wal-MartLabs, which has 1,200 workers and all the trappings of a Silicon Valley startup including treadmill desks and ping pong tables. For instance, Wal-MartLabs developed technology that enables Wal-Mart’s mobile app to help guide shoppers to products. It also developed technology that enables the mobile app to track customers’ spending based on a predetermined budget.

Wal-Mart, which is based in Bentonville, Ark., says having a presence in Silicon Valley has been invaluable in part because it offers the company early access to technology entrepreneurs. For example, two years ago, Wal-MartLabs met the founders of a startup called Grabble as they were in Silicon Valley pitching their technology that enables customers to get receipts for their purchases by email. Wal-Mart has since bought the startup, hired the founders, and next year, shoppers will be able to get the so-called e-receipts.

The company says it’s so pleased with its results at Wal-MartLabs that it plans to open another tech office in nearby Sunnyvale in January. It also has smaller tech hubs elsewhere. “We are not a retailer in Silicon Valley,” says Neil Ashe, CEO of Wal-Mart’s global e-commerce operations. “We are building an Internet technology company inside the largest retailer.”

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