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Music

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The End Records

Freshcut

‘The Revolution is Never Coming’ The Red Paintings

The ideal circumstance for listening to The Red Paintings’ debut “The Revolution Is Never Coming” would be to lie on your back, eyes closed, with no distractions and no interruptions.

So perhaps the Australian act’s target demographic should be disaffected teens, grounded away from others, restricted to only music technology and sequestered in their rooms. Their minds just might be open to this complex work, and they’d be among the few who would be in the proper setting to digest it.

Still, it might take an adult to fully appreciate the vision and effort frontman Trash McSweeney invested in this five-year project. The release is painstakingly orchestrated, dense beyond comprehension and brimming with passion.

“The Revolution Is Never Coming” is earnest theatrical art-rock, breathtaking in scope. It’s reminiscent of Tool, Nine Inch Nails and Radiohead at times, but it’s more than that as sprawling tracks and changes in time-signatures create an apocalypse of sound where long guitar solos, horns, strings, harp and synthesizers push and pull through an elaborate, histrionic dance.

Kudos to McSweeney for finding a way to express himself so artistically and so thoroughly. Yet he over-challenges his audience, ... and it’s hard to be heard when you make it difficult for others to listen to you.

– Chuck Campbell, Scripps Howard News Service

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