You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Indiana

  • Changes urged for state ethics code
    INDIANAPOLIS – Indiana’s outgoing Inspector General wants lawmakers to make several key changes to state ethics code – including adding transparency to the use of post-employment waivers and strengthening conflict-of-
  • St. Joseph County rejects joining Toll Road venture
    SOUTH BEND – St. Joseph County is the latest to balk at joining a multicounty consortium trying to lease the Indiana Toll Road.
  • Lottery operator not winning
    INDIANAPOLIS – The Hoosier Lottery’s private operator is expected to miss its revenue goals for the second time and pay another penalty, officials told the State Budget Committee on Thursday.
Advertisement

Indiana state park deer hunts reach 20th year

NASHVILLE, Ind. – A state wildlife official says the deer hunts that started in one of Indiana’s most-popular state parks 20 years ago has helped improve its ecosystem.

The December 1993 deer hunt at Brown County State Park near Nashville was met with protesters carrying signs saying “Kill Hunger, Not Deer” and “Hunting, Sport of Cowards.”

Brown County and 20 other state parks are closed Monday and Tuesday to the general public so the deer hunts can take place.

Other state parks hosting reductions this year include: Chain O’Lakes, Charlestown, Clifty Falls (archery), Fort Harrison (archery), Harmonie, Indiana Dunes, Lincoln, McCormick’s Creek, Ouabache, Pokagon, Potato Creek, Prophetstown, Shades, Shakamak, Spring Mill, Summit Lake, Tippecanoe, Turkey Run, Versailles and Whitewater Memorial.

State parks natural resources chief Mike Mycroft tells The Herald-Times (http://bit.ly/1k1bASB) that the agency doesn’t get much criticism against the hunts nowadays.

Mycroft says more wildflower species are growing in the Brown County park than before the start of the hunts, when an over population of deer were clearing the forest of vegetation.

Advertisement