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Sexual assault cases being investigated
WASHINGTON – The Army is investigating sexual abuse allegations against an officer who trains military prosecutors who handle sexual and physical abuse cases, a defense official said Thursday.
Lt. Col. Joseph Morse is being investigated by the Army’s Criminal Investigation Command for allegedly groping a female Army lawyer in 2011 while both were attending a weeklong training session in Northern Virginia on prosecuting sexual assaults, said the official.

Pentagon victory on rape cases

Commanders keep authority

– Bowing to the Pentagon, the Senate agreed after impassioned debate Thursday to leave the authority to prosecute rapes and other serious crimes with military commanders in a struggle that highlighted the growing role of women in Congress.

The vote was 55-45 in favor of stripping commanders of that authority, but that was short of the 60 necessary to move ahead on the legislation sponsored by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand.

Her bill would have given the decision to take serious crimes to courts-martial to seasoned military trial lawyers, independent of the chain of command.

Sen. Joe Donnelly, D-Ind., voted in favor of advancing the bill, and Sen. Dan Coats, R-Ind., voted in opposition.

The debate and vote were the culmination of a nearly yearlong campaign to curb sexual assault in the ranks, led by female senators who have questioned whether the military’s mostly male leadership understands differences between relatively minor sexual offenses and serious crimes that deserve swift and decisive justice.

Thursday’s rejection is unlikely to be the final word. Defeated but unyielding, Gillibrand and her allies vowed to seize the next opportunity to force another vote, probably in the spring when the Senate starts work on a sweeping defense policy bill for the 2015 fiscal year.

“Many people said to me, ‘Kirsten, I’m going to watch this, and if it doesn’t get better in the next six months, I’m with you next time,’ ” she said at a news conference.

Pentagon leaders vigorously opposed the measure, as did former prosecutors and military veterans in the Senate who argued that commanders should have more responsibility, not less, for the conduct of the men and women they lead in war and peacetime.

“We can’t let the commanders walk away,” insisted Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri, who bemoaned the tenor of a policy debate that pitted her against fellow Democrat Gillibrand.

Backers of the measure insisted that piecemeal reforms have had only a limited impact on a problem that even the military has called an epidemic. Survey results have suggested that some 26,000 people, mostly women, may have been sexually assaulted in the most recent accounting with thousands unwilling to come forward for fear of inaction or retribution.

“The people who don’t trust the chain of the command are the victims,” Gillibrand said.

Among the Republicans voting with Gillibrand were Republican leader Mitch McConnell, who faces Democratic challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes in his re-election bid, and Mike Enzi of Wyoming.

In fact, Gillibrand’s effort divided the Senate in ways that smashed conventional lines on both gender and political party.

Conservative Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas and Rand Paul of Kentucky backed her effort, while the chairman of the Armed Services Committee, Democratic Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan, opposed it. Including Gillibrand, the bill had the support of 17 of the Senate’s 20 women.

In two hours of debate, proponents and opponents argued on the Senate floor based on personal experiences, growing frustration with what they dismissed as fixes around the edges and horrific stories from the ranks.

“The current system is failing the men and women in uniform,” said one of the Senate’s newest members, John Walsh, D-Mont., who spent 33 years in the Montana National Guard and is the first Iraq War veteran in the body. “We have moved too slowly.”

On the other side was Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., a West Point graduate who served in the 82nd Airborne Division as an infantry platoon leader and company commander. Reed said stripping commanders of the authority to discipline the troops would be “detrimental to the effectiveness of the force and common goal to reduce sexual assault.”

After blocking Gillibrand’s bill, the Senate moved toward overwhelming passage of a measure sponsored by McCaskill and two Republican senators – Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire and Deb Fischer of Nebraska.

That bill would eliminate the “good solider defense” – that a service member’s character and military performance can be used in a case – unless it is directly connected to the allegation. And it would allow sexual assault victims to challenge their discharges or separation from service.

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