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‘Vaping’ regulations overdue

Could someone please send the Food and Drug Administration a copy of the latest study on teens and e-cigarettes? The agency obviously needs a push to come out with its overdue regulations.

Drawn from two surveys of tens of thousands of American middle-school and high-school students, the research found that adolescents who tried battery-powered nicotine vaporizers were more likely to smoke tobacco cigarettes. And if the kids were already regular smokers at the time they experimented with “vaping,” they became less likely to quit. It’s evidence, as the authors say, that e-cigarettes are “aggravating rather than ameliorating the tobacco epidemic among youths.”

Yet the FDA has still not begun to regulate e-cigarettes, despite pledging to do so by last fall. Some states and cities have already started to impose regulations. Meanwhile, the number of vapers keeps rising; U.S. consumers will spend $3 billion on e-cigarettes this year, twice last year’s total.

Last month, the European Parliament passed a list of e-cigarette restrictions, including a ban on advertisements, a requirement for childproof packaging with pictorial safety warnings and a limit on nicotine content. Those are all smart rules, as is a ban on sales to minors and restrictions on candy flavors that are meant to appeal to kids.

More research is still needed to discern specific health hazards, as well as relative safety compared with tobacco. Yet it’s not too soon to conclude regulation is needed to keep e-cigarettes from children.

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