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Courtesy Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control
Virginia Fryback and Charlie

Cat missing for 5 years is returned to owner

Statement as issued Wednesday by Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control:

Virginia Fryback of Fort Wayne couldn’t believe she was being contacted about her lost cat Charlie. He disappeared from home five years ago and although she searched, he seemed to have vanished. That is until 10 year old Charlie showed up at Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control on Monday, April 20. Animal Care & Control officials scanned the cat and discovered Charlie has a microchip that identifies Virginia Fryback as the owner. According to shelter spokesperson Peggy A. Bender, “We routinely scan all lost pets for a microchip and it’s wonderful when we find one and can notify an owner that we have their lost pet. The chip has likely saved Charlie’s life because most people choose to adopt a much younger cat.”

Microchips are tiny transponders, about the size of a grain of rice, that use radio frequency waves to transmit information about an animal. They’re designed to last about 25 years and they are implanted by a veterinarian or animal shelter just under the skin, usually right between the shoulder blades.

Fryback stated that she is extremely grateful that her veterinarian convinced her to get a microchip for Charlie when he was a kitten. “I never thought I see him again,” said Fryback.

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